• Subaru BRZ review

    Subaru BRZ review

    The Subaru BRZ is one of the best kept secrets of the auotmotive world.

    Developed alongisde the near-identical Toyota GT86, it’s an affordable back-to-basics front
    engined, rear-wheel drive 2+2 sports coupe.

    For 2017, Subaru has given the evergreen BRZ a mid-life facelift, equipment upgrade and distilled the trim options down to just one – SE Lux.

    Subaru BRZ review

    The exterior design tweaks are subtle, apart from the old school aerodynamic wing at the rear. Elsewhere, there’s a new front bumper, LED headlights and 10-spoke 17-inch alloys.

    You can choose from five colours, though Subaru’s iconic WR (World Rally) Blue Pearl is surely the one to go for.

    Inside, a 4.2-inch LCD colour display is added to the instrument display, featuring such sporting essentials as a G-Force meter and braking gauge.

    Subaru BRZ review

    The leather steering wheel is now smaller and boasts audio controls, while plastics generally have been upgraded or replaced by leather, giving the cabin a more upmarket feel.

    The Alcantra and leather seats are more comfortable than ever (the driver’s seat has a six-way adjustment), while a 6.2-inch touchscreen has been added to the centre console, though sat nav is a £1,250 option.

    The infotainment system is not as hi-tech as the best of them, but it does the job and, of course, offers full connectivity.

    Subaru BRZ review

    Traditionalists will be pleased to note that the cockpit is still adorned with plenty of retro-feel knobs and toggle switches.

    The rear passenger seats are fitted with ISOFIX anchor points, but as with most 2+2s, they are
    almost totally useless. Better news in the boot where there’s 243 litres of space available – 1,270 with the rear seats folded flat.

    The 2017 Subaru BRZ is more driver focused than ever. Sadly, there’s no extra power for the 2.0-
    litre 200PS ‘Boxer’ petrol engine, but it is more responsive, it still sounds suitably throaty and CO2 emissions are slightly lower.

    Subaru BRZ review

    Elsewhere, Subaru’s engineers have made various changes (to the steering, suspension, dampers and
    brakes) to tweak the driving dynamics and make the BRZ even sharper than before.

    Priced from £26,050, the BRZ is one of the most entertaining cars you’ll find for that money.

    The chassis is better than ever and it’s enormous fun on flowing country roads. Agile and engaging, it’s helped by a slick six-speed short-throw manual gearbox and it feels totally
    planted.

    Subaru BRZ review

    For the record, the BRZ is capable of 0-62mph in 7.6 seconds (but feels faster) and it tops out at 140mph. Fuel economy is a claimed 36.2mpg (and it not far off that in the real world), while CO2 emissions are a very average 180g/km.

    But here’s the thing. The BRZ is also now available with automatic transmission – and it’s a bit of a revelation.

    Subaru BRZ review

    It may sounds like sacrilege in a sports car package like this, but the auto box slams through the gears pretty well – even producing the odd pop on down-changes, allowing you to concentrate on the driving. The engine even sounds more sporty.

    Verdict: The new, improved Subaru BRZ is better than ever. With a mild makeover inside and out, plus enhanced driving dynamics, it has to be one of the best-value, most entertaining sports cars
    on the market – and it still looks just as cool.

    Review by Gareth Herincx

    Subaru BRZ review

    The post Subaru BRZ review appeared first on Automotive Blog.

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    Car Guy Chronicles

    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Curabitur non gravida velit. Aenean varius nulla diam, eu scelerisque metus malesuada sit amet. Duis blandit efficitur tellus, vel fermentum nisl pretium ac. In molestie placerat auctor. Mauris a tempor magna. Aliquam vulputate, dolor vitae bibendum aliquam, arcu nunc finibus erat, id blandit nibh nulla ultrices libero. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Suspendisse quis rhoncus elit. Sed maximus metus finibus viverra porttitor. Ut eget dictum nulla, vel congue lectus. Vivamus suscipit lacus in laoreet tempor. Duis quis laoreet libero. Aliquam erat volutpat. Curabitur nec eleifend augue. Pellentesque semper non massa in interdum. Curabitur vulputate mi vel tempus ultricies.

    Vivamus cursus ex ac magna dignissim ornare. Phasellus pharetra lacus sit amet diam molestie tempor ut at lacus. Curabitur vel mattis enim. Aenean ac pellentesque mi, sit amet sagittis nisl. Nam efficitur vestibulum urna eget vestibulum. Donec interdum odio sapien, ac pulvinar magna tempus sed. Integer aliquam at dolor et bibendum. Cras ut facilisis sapien, eget aliquam sapien.

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  • New Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket Comes With Over-Trousers

    Ever had to peel off soggy jeans after a rainstorm? It was dry and sunny when you left. But then the rain came and now you’re wearing soaked denim leggings. And your legs have turned blue from a combination of the cold and colours running. Well, the new Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket comes with over-trousers in a large rear pocket to prevent that happening again.

    2017 Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket comes with overtrousers built in
    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket carries lightweight over-trousers in a large rear pocket

    The over-trousers aren’t going to get you through a track day. But they will keep you snug and dry if you get caught out by a shower. So while Weise may call it a touring jacket, we’d say it’s as good for short trips and commuting, without having to carry a backpack full of spare kit. Especially when armoured jeans have become more and more popular.

    The W-Tex trousers have a full polyester lining, with an elasticated waist and Velcro ankle pull tabs. So they’re easy to wear and should be comfortable.

    The Weise W-Tex waterproof jeans come with the Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket

    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket itself is your standard all-weather motorcycle jacket. It has a waterproof and breathable drop liner, plus a full-length popper and Velcro storm flap over a YKK zip to keep your top half dry.

    Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket
    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket in Black/Stone

    There’s a removable 120-gram thermal quilted liner to cope with changing temperatures. And large two-way zipped vents at the cuffs, shoulders and on the back to let cool air in when you need it.

    The shell of the Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket is made from tough 600 denier material. And there’s removable Knox Micro-Lock CE-approved armour at the shoulders, elbows and back.

    2017 Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket with Over-Trousers Black
    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket in Black

    To help you be seen, there is reflective detailing on the arms and back. And you can adjust the collar, waist and torso to get the right fit. The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket has the large rear pocket for storing your handy over-trousers, and also has four large external pockets and two smaller hand warmer pockets.

    2017 Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket with Over-Trousers Back

    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket with the W-Tex waterproof jeans included will cost £289.99 and comes in Black (sizes M-5XL) and Black/Stone (sizes M-3XL).

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  • What drives British motorists mad?

    New survey shows what really drives British motorists mad

    Driving, it can be the best of times or the worst of times, but in this modern age of congestion and bad drivers it is becoming more frustrating by the day. A new survey by YourParkingSpace into the driving habits of the British has revealed just what drives motorists mad.

    The results showed that people not indicating annoyed British motorists the most, while using a mobile phone and bad parking both featured highly on the list. The survey polled 1,028 drivers throughout the UK asking ‘What annoys you the most about being a car driver in the UK?’ the full results are below:

    1. People not indicating (72%)
    2. Talking on a mobile phone (71%)
    3. Bad parking (56%)
    4. Traffic Jams (52%)
    5. Slow drivers (42%)
    6. Not being able to find a parking space (40%)

    The data also showed that men were more likely to get annoyed by slow drivers, but both sexes found not indicating and talking on a mobile phone to be equally as irritating. Furthermore 40% of drivers polled stated that trying to find a suitable parking space was frustrating.

    Bad parking- grr!

    Bad parking- grr!

    YourParkingSpace wanted to find out more about the issue of parking, so asked those participants who had chosen parking as their most frustrating option how they felt about parking charges in their local area.

    48% stated that they thought that parking charges were too expensive, while 29% said that they were reasonable in their local area.

    What do you think of parking charges in your local area?

    • Parking charges are too expensive – 48%
    • Parking charges are reasonable – 29%
    • Parking is free – 23%

    The data show that parking fee opinions varied greatly depending on location with over 40% of drivers in England stating that parking was too expensive, while only 29% of Scottish drivers felt the same. Coincidentally Scotland seemed to have the highest number of free parking spaces with a third of drivers from north of the border indicating they can park for free.

    Managing Director of YourParkingSpace, Harrison Woods, commented on the survey:

    “It is interesting to look into the psyche of the British driver, to see what they like and what irritates them about driving. People not indicating and using mobile phones when driving are not only irritating to other road users, but also very dangerous, causing accidents and damage as well as breaking the law. “

    He added:

    “One thing that didn’t surprise us was the fact that 40% of motorists become frustrated when searching for parking spaces and that a large proportion of those questioned felt that parking charges were too expensive. Parking spaces have become a premium commodity in recent years, especially in major cities, and the fact that parking spaces have been getting smaller and cars getting bigger has just exacerbated the situation.”

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  • Toyota’s UK vote of confidence

    Toyota has announced that it will invest a further £240 million in its plant at Burnaston in Derbyshire.

    Starting this year, the facility will be upgraded with new equipment, technologies and systems so that it can produce future vehicles using the new Toyota New Global Architecture (TNGA) platform.

    By 2020, the majority of Toyota’s models will be built using TNGA platforms which already underpin the new Prius and the all-new C-HR crossover, which is built in Turkey.

    “Our investment demonstrates that, as a company, we are doing all we can to raise the competitiveness of our Burnaston plant in Derbyshire,” said Dr Johan van Zyl, President and CEO of Toyota Motor Europe.

    “Continued tariff-and-barrier free market access between the UK and Europe that is predictable and uncomplicated will be vital for future success.”

    Toyota has been making cars in the UK since 1992 and the Burnaston factory employs about 2,500 people.

    The Avensis, Auris and Auris Hybrid are currently produced at the site. In 2015, 239,728 British-built Toyota cars were manufactured at the giant plant.

    The post Toyota’s UK vote of confidence appeared first on Automotive Blog.

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