• Rent a Supercar

    Have you ever dreamed of driving a Lamborghini or Ferrari? Well now you can, and not just for a few laps around a track. With specialist supercar hire firms you can rent out a supercar for an entire day, weekend or week.

    A short 10 minutes of form filling and payment of the applicable fee and you are free to drive away your supercar of choice.  You can even have your chosen car delivered to your door, anywhere in the UK, such as your place of work, home or airport.

    Here are 3 exciting Hybrid supercars of the moment which you can rent short or long term.

    BMW i8 Hybrid

    With a price range starting from £750.00 per day, experience the first supercar with the consumption and emission values of a small family car. The i8 brings comfort, style, economy and power all in one. Apart from drawing stares, the i8 means business on the race track.

    BMW i8

    BMW i8

    Porsche 918 Spyder Hybrid

    The Porsche 918 Spyder is an awe-inspiring mid-engined plug-in hybrid supercar completely in a class of its own due to Porsches racing and economy pedigree. Did you know that the 918 Spyder is the second plug-in hybrid from Porsche after the Panamera S E-Hybrid? Get behind the wheel for £2200.00 per day

    porsche 918 spyder hybrid

    Porsche 918 spyder hybrid

    McLaren P1 Hybrid

    The McLaren P1 is a plug-in hybrid supercar built in limited numbers. McLaren’s F1 background has made a dramatic impact on the evolution of Hybrid Supercars. Being the successor to the F1, it utilizes hybrid power and Formula 1 technology to the extreme. All yours to enjoy for £2200.00 per day.

    Continue Reading…

  • Aston Martin to Build 25 More DB4 GTs

    By , Permalink

    Aston isn’t the first manufacturer to reissue one of its classics; Jaguar produced six lightweight E-types using chassis numbers that were issued but never used in period and is now doing nine XKSS roadsters. Various other low-volume models have been put back into ultra-limited production, including the Shelby Cobra and the DeLorean. But the DB4 GT is perhaps the most ambitious such project yet, with Aston announcing that it plans to produce 25 “lightweight” GTs. Only 75 cars were produced during the original run, of which only eight were the stripped-out lightweights. Yet, as tends to be the case with limited-edition Aston models, all have already been sold, despite a price of $1.9 million at current exchange rates. Then again, that’s still only about half what original DB4 GTs are selling for.

    December is a month of reflection, a time when people look back on the year that has passed, sometimes with rose-tinted nostalgia and sometimes with sobbing melancholy. At Aston Martin, the spirit of introspection has bitten hard—although with some distant coordinates programmed into the corporate time machine. Because the British company has announced it’s going to produce a “continuation” version of the DB4 GT, a car that was first introduced back in 1959.

     

     Aston says it will issue the new cars with VINs following on from those given to the original cars, and they will also be built in almost the same place: Aston Martin’s Works division in Newport Pagnell, England, which sits on part of the site of the company’s former factory. As such, they will be the first cars made in Newport Pagnell since production of the first-generation Vanquish ended there in 2007.

    Buyers won’t be able to enjoy the DB4 GT’s doubtless considerable charms on the road; with no modern safety or emissions gear, they’re being sold for track use only. Aston will be offering a two-year track driving program for owners. It will be held “at a number of the world’s finest racetracks, including the spectacular Yas Marina circuit in Abu Dhabi,” making it very similar in principle to the billionaire track-day scheme under which the Aston Martin Vulcan was sold. The obvious question is whether Aston will choose to offer any other “continuation” model in year to come. The back catalog isn’t exactly short of greatest hits worthy of being reissued.

    The new cars will be made in exactly the same way as the originals, with thin-gauge aluminum panels fitted over a tubular frame. Power will come from a straight-six engine with twin spark plugs per cylinder that produces a claimed 331 horsepower and breathes through triple twin-choke Weber carburetors. This is very similar in design to the original engine, but capacity has gone up from 3.7 liters to 4.1 liters, and output has risen by 30 horsepower. Power will be sent to the rear axle through a period-appropriate four-speed manual gearbox and a limited-slip differential. No performance numbers have been given, but since it will weigh just 2706 pounds, the GT’s acceleration will certainly be brisk. In its day, it was one of the fastest cars in the world and won its debut race at the hands of Stirling Moss.

  • Torsen differential

    By , Permalink

    Torsen differential is a unique method of providing differential action and has many patented components. As a trademark of the JTEKT Corporation, it does an excellent job while overcoming the traction difference problem. In addition, its internal components are pretty different from the ones that you’ll find in a conventional differential. Thus, it’s worth checking out.

    At the heart of the system of the Torse differential lies a shaped gear pair assembly that’s quite specific. One gear is worm gear and the other is spur gear. Now, this differential works on a very simple principle called worm wheels. This means that the spinning worm gear can rotate the wheel but, on the other hand, the rotating wheel cannot speed that gear. That’s one of the most fascinating things about it. Of course, there are many more things to the Torsen that you’ll find out in the video below.

    Torsen differential for the most ingenious differential action so far!
    All in all, this differential brings many advantages. The locking action is instantaneous in the Torsen while it other technologies the drive wheel slips for a limited amount of time before getting locked. If the vehicle encounters a traction difference track and it features a Torsen differential, the wheels will lock immediately. Check out the video below!

  • 2016 Porsche 911 R

    By Permalink

    It is the reminder of a lost childhood. It smells of petrol, of asphalt, of the race track. It can tell you tales of historic races, of victories and records, of naturally aspirated engines and manual transmissions, of red stripes and of the Porsche logo on its side.

    The Porsche 911 R was built specifically for motor racing in 1967. Now it is back – in a limited edition of just 991 units.

    Join two Porsche enthusiasts on the road to perfect vehicle control under the guidance of works driver Patrick Long in our web special. Their goal: Complete a stage of the legendary Tour de France Automobile of 1969.
    Germans have long labored under the stereotype of being a little, well, buttoned up, a little too serious. But, like all stereotypes, this one isn’t a good predictor of individual behavior. Take, for example, our experience driving the 2016 Porsche 911 R in the hills around the company’s Stuttgart headquarters.

    We were bombing along a rural highway, marveling at the R’s delicious exhaust note, when we noticed off to the right a pasture filled with naked animals. While they appeared to be sizable creatures, they were not, in fact, bovine. These were naked humans, bunches of them, reclining on folding chairs and blankets and basking in the Friday afternoon sun. And given the hue of their skin, which closely resembled the pure white of the Porsche we were driving, one would hope they were enjoying it responsibly, with a great, heaping mound of sunblock to protect their ample flesh.

    zoom

    The roads we were driving also were thick with motorcycles, as various Stuttgarters were looking to get an early start on the weekend. This is all to say, that, in our experience, Germany is not just suits, ties, and people who refuse to turn on the air conditioning. These people were happily hanging out, literally and figuratively, having fun for the sake of it. And clearly Porsche was having fun with this stripped-down, devil-may-care version of the 911. In fact, when the boss of Porsche’s GT division, Andreas Preuninger (who goes by “Andy”), talks about the R, he presents it as the automotive equivalent of a motorcycle.

    “It’s a car just for a fun day,” he said. “It’s about how good you feel in the car and not how fast you can go.” The 911 R is neither buttoned up nor a particularly responsible car. It’s not a long-distance tourer, as many versions of the 911 have become. It’s loud. It vibrates in a way that a standard-issue 911 would never be allowed to do. Oh, and it comes only with a manual gearbox, thank you. It is as close to a purist’s 911 as is possible this deep into the regulated 21st century, and it is closer to Preuninger’s heart than anything else he has worked on in his 15 years on the job.

    We at Save the Manuals HQ have a similar outlook. Even 911s with downsized turbocharged engines and dual-clutch automatics push our passion meter near the red zone. But a 911 with the 500-hp 4.0-liter naturally aspirated flat-six from the GT3 RS track car bolted into its ass, sending all that power through something not available in the GT3s, a six-speed manual gearbox? Now we’re talking.

    zoom

    But before we open our hymnals and commence with the boisterous praise, there is one thing you need to know: You can’t have a 911 R. No, not even if you can muster the $185,950 base price. This purist’s 911 is not a new model line. It is a (very) special edition. It’s constructed of steel, carbon fiber, and magnesium (among other less compelling ingredients), but once those elements are combined, the result becomes unobtainium. A grand total of 991 examples of the R are being built, a nod to the current 911’s generation code. Preuninger acknowledged that the company could surely sell at least a few multiples of that number. If the price and limited production were not significant enough barriers to purchasing one, consider that, at least in the United States, the 300 American 918 Spyder owners were given the right of first refusal. Porsche won’t say how many 918 owners bought 911 Rs. The company will say only that some of the U.S. allotment of Rs was purchased by non-918 owners. This turns the 911 R into an investment vehicle as much as a vehicle in which to pursue the joy of driving.

    Okay, with that out of the way, let’s waste no more time in declaring the 911 R fabulous. The R is a parts-bin car, in the best possible way. It looks essentially like a 911 GT3/GT3 RS without the more obvious aero addenda. From the RS, the R gets a magnesium roof, carbon-fiber decklids front and rear, and carbon-fiber front fenders. According to Porsche, the R is the lightest of the current 911s, declaring its curb weight to be 3021 pounds. It’s wide and low, and its bulging fenders barely contain the delicate-looking 20-inch center-lock wheels. It wears sticky Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires (245 millimeters wide up front and 305 in the rear). Its engine is the same dry-sump 4.0-liter flat-six used in the GT3 cars, pumped to full RS spec, and it sounds, at its 8250-rpm power peak, like a Porsche Cup race car. It redlines at 8500 rpm, down from 8800 in the GT3 RS (and 9000 in the GT3), because of the increased centrifugal mass of its manual-gearbox clutch. The other applications of this engine are paired with dual-clutch automatics. That loss of ultimate engine speed, though, is no loss at all, since it is more than offset by the six-speed manual gearbox. It uses the same basic case as the seven-speed manual found in more mainstream 911s, but with reworked internals and no damn need for a fuel-saving, highway-only seventh gear. It’s just mass, donchaknow?

    Porsche 911 R

    The cars we drove were equipped with a light single-mass flywheel (saving about 11 pounds over the standard dual-mass flywheel), costing $3650. This has two immediately obvious benefits: First, the engine feels eager to zing through its rev range. And second, at idle, it allows a level of vibration, rattle, and buzz to radiate from the gearbox, through the center tunnel of the car. This sort of rudeness, of course, would never be permitted in a standard 911. But in the R it feels like a statement of purpose and a rebuke of the NVH guys. The engine also contributes some vibration and noise at idle. And, again, it is welcome.

    So Much Specialness

    Other special bits and pieces include standard carbon-ceramic brakes that, yes, also contribute the occasional squeal to the chorus of noises but provide stand-on-the-nose, utterly fade-free stopping power. The car carries a conventional limited-slip differential, not any fancy electronically locking diff. Steering is by way of the same electrically boosted rack-and-pinion as used in the GT cars, but it’s tuned for slightly lighter weight. Likewise, the suspension is GT-spec stuff, with full adjustability, and uses the same spring rates and anti-roll bars. The dampers, however, carry a specific tune better suited to road driving than the GT stuff.

    Tuck your behind into the one-piece carbon-fiber seats (fear not: they are sized for adult human beings, not race-car-driving waifs), and you’ll notice that Porsche has also added a smear of nostalgia to the R. The seats have leather-covered sides with vintage-Porsche houndstooth fabric inserts. The black-faced gauges carry light green markings, a reference to old 911s. The interior otherwise is pretty standard for a 911, except for the absence of rear seats. In case anyone fails to notice the retro vibe, optional over-the-top red or green stripes and Porsche name stickers can be fitted along each flank. There are only two standard body colors, white and silver, but about 10 percent of buyers paid an extra $6000 to have their cars painted in a color of their choice.

    You could conceivably drive around in an R without its being recognized if you chose to forgo the stripes. The 911 R rides under the radar all the more because it ditches the big rear wing of the RS. The R has a specific underbody rear diffuser, which is not visible at eye level, and a relatively small front splitter to bring some downforce to the equation. But the R generates about a quarter of the rear downforce of the RS. The exhaust note, while plenty loud at high rpm, doesn’t include any silly, programmed-in showboating pops and crackles on overrun.

    Fast? Of Course It’s Fast

    We bombed around the rural area outside Stuttgart, squirting between towns, alternating between berserk blasts of speed and trundling through town centers. The R proved to be a perfectly pleasant and tractable road car. The ride quality, at least on perfectly maintained German roads, was surprisingly supple. Thanks in part to its rear steering system, the R was unflappably stable no matter how ham-fisted we were. The shifter is a short-throw affair with just the right amount of weight to feel certain without ever feeling resistant. Go ahead and rush your shifts.

    Rush them too much, though, or shift when your ears tell you to, and you will be short-shifting the thing at something like 6000 rpm. Stay in it. There’s little that is more satisfying than having this engine wailing away at 8000 rpm, ripping a quick upshift, and climbing back up to its power peak over and over again. We guarantee you’ll be going faster than you think you are. We didn’t bother trying to do the mental math to convert from kilometers to miles per hour. The answer would only have been some version of “fast” anyway. Throttle response is, well, perfect. It’s never touchy. But the engine is alive and always at the ready. Unlike in most other Porsches, pushing the Sport button on the center console does not change throttle response; why change what is already right? It only turns on the automatic throttle blips for downshifts. Don’t like that? Turn it off. It affects nothing else. We must say, though, we grew to really like it.

    The R is an impressively neutral handler, too. You would have to try hard to generate understeer. But predictably, this is no tail-happy hoon-mobile, either. The car just feels planted and forgiving.

    Porsche - 911 R - Principle of Purity.

    We were bombing along a rural highway, marveling at the R’s delicious exhaust note, when we noticed off to the right a pasture filled with naked animals. While they appeared to be sizable creatures, they were not, in fact, bovine. These were naked humans, bunches of them, reclining on folding chairs and blankets and basking in the Friday afternoon sun. And given the hue of their skin, which closely resembled the pure white of the Porsche we were driving, one would hope they were enjoying it responsibly, with a great, heaping mound of sunblock to protect their ample flesh.

    The roads we were driving also were thick with motorcycles, as various Stuttgarters were looking to get an early start on the weekend. This is all to say, that, in our experience, Germany is not just suits, ties, and people who refuse to turn on the air conditioning. These people were happily hanging out, literally and figuratively, having fun for the sake of it. And clearly Porsche was having fun with this stripped-down, devil-may-care version of the 911. In fact, when the boss of Porsche’s GT division, Andreas Preuninger (who goes by “Andy”), talks about the R, he presents it as the automotive equivalent of a motorcycle.

    “It’s a car just for a fun day,” he said. “It’s about how good you feel in the car and not how fast you can go.” The 911 R is neither buttoned up nor a particularly responsible car. It’s not a long-distance tourer, as many versions of the 911 have become. It’s loud. It vibrates in a way that a standard-issue 911 would never be allowed to do. Oh, and it comes only with a manual gearbox, thank you. It is as close to a purist’s 911 as is possible this deep into the regulated 21st century, and it is closer to Preuninger’s heart than anything else he has worked on in his 15 years on the job.

  • Rory Reid vs Ford Focus RS – Top Gear: Series 23 – BBC

    By , Permalink

    After burning up Europe for years, this best-in-class 350-horsepower2 hatchback has taken its 2.3L EcoBoost® engine to another level. Beefed up where it counts, the Ford Performance All-Wheel-Drive System intelligently distributes power for maximum benefit, both front and rear as well as left and right. And with four different driving modes, including “Track” and “Drift”1, you can dominate the course no matter the mood you’re in.

    Suspension doesn’t tame power. It sets it free.
    We didn’t just stick best-in-class 350 horsepower and 350 lb.-ft. of torque2 under the hood and pat ourselves on the back. Those numbers don’t count for anything without control. So the 2017 Focus RS has an advanced Ford Performance All-Wheel-Drive System that precisely distributes the power where you need it, as well as driver-selectable suspension settings that let you tune the ride to suit your style.

    Even the interior offers high performance.
    The 2017 Focus RS certainly has the chops to create all kinds of driving adventure. But you’re its master and the interior proves it. You can adjust its all-wheel drive and the suspension to your exact needs and wants. And, it offers the stay-connected technology you need to stay on top of just about everything.

    silde banner

    2.3L EcoBoost® I-4
    350 Horsepower

    Performance and Technology
    From the tires up, Ford engineers composed a masterpiece of moving pieces, each working in precise synchrony with all of the others. The result is more than the sum of its parts. Focus RS is a machine intended to produce pure exhilaration behind the wheel.

    Aerodynamics
    Thanks to enhanced aerodynamic redesigns of the front grille and the rear diffuser and the unique spoiler, the Focus RS maximizes downforce while creating zero lift for optimum high-speed handling

dd