• Just Where Are The Best Deals on Wheels?

    When looking to buy a car there is certainly no shortage of choice. The UK has over 4,900 franchised dealers plus many more generalists. Car auctions, internet sites and private ads offer even more options but this still leaves many buyers wondering just where is the best place to get a really good deal.

    For most people, a car is likely to be the second most expensive single item that they will ever buy and so it is important to get it right. There is certainly plenty of choice and if you are looking to buy a used car in the London area, it is possible to find almost every conceivable make and model within a radius of a few miles. The first decision is whether to buy new or second-hand. New car sales are booming, fuelled largely by some of the new methods of financing them such as personal contract plans and leasing as new recruits to the world of motoring consider car ownership very much along the same lines as mobile phone contracts with a continuous monthly charge and regular upgrades being the order of the day. The canny buyer, however, realises that such a throw-away mentality results in some great cars appearing on the second-hand market and it usually means that the first owner has paid dearly for the privilege of new car ownership or lease. A car’s value depends on several things but one of the most predictable is its age and the depreciation curve is invariably steeper in its early days.

    By steering clear of the lure of new cars, a buyer may suddenly realise that his budget will now stretch to a much better specified car. Most car purchases involve the heart more than the head and even our London buyer may fancifully visualise cruising along deserted country roads with the roof down whereas, in reality, a nose-to-tail daily commute is probably much more likely with emission levels and congestion charges figuring highly in any car buying decision.

    There are undoubtedly some great bargains to be found but the risks should not be underestimated. Perhaps the ideal car could be almost new or fairly young, low mileage, well maintained and with a known history. An ex-demonstrator from a franchised dealer or an ex-lease car could probably fit the bill and some of those previously used by disabled people under the Motability leasing scheme can often be exceptionally good but the range of vehicles on offer may be rather limited. Buying ex-fleet vehicles is another option to be considered but some of these may have covered high mileages and a used taxi or minibus is certainly not to be recommended.

    Another interesting idea is to check what vehicles are available from car rental companies such as those offered under the Hertz Rent2Buy scheme. The idea that ex-rental cars have been roughly treated by uncaring drivers is simply not borne out by the facts and there are some real gems to be found. Hertz even allow for an extended test drive in the form of rental for a few days so there should be no unpleasant surprises here!

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  • Valuing Your Car

    Selling Your Car? Here’s How to Get the Best Idea of What It’s Worth.

    If you’re in the market to sell off your old car you have a few different options when it comes to a valuation, even without leaving the comfort of your own home. These vary both in terms of how involved they are, and how precise the results are, so here are your options, and our verdict on which to go with.

    The Old Fashioned Way

    We say old fashioned, but you’d most likely use the internet for this method in this day and age. This is the quick and dirty method to get a very rough idea of what you can expect your wheels to go for.

    It basically entails looking up the prices of other cars of the same or similar make and model that are currently on the market to get a ballpark figure and that’s kind of it. This might be the first method that comes to mind for some people but we honestly can’t recommend it.

    It probably takes more effort than either of the other popular methods, and gives less accurate results, so it really has nothing going for it.
    Of course, there’s also the really old fashioned way—just drive the car to a dealership and ask them how much they’ll give you for it.

    Free Valuation Tools

    There is a wide array of online car valuation tools that are free to use and easy to find — they’re literally the first thing that will come up if you type ‘car valuation’ into a search engine. They’re typically found on car selling sites, but you’re under no obligation to use those sites — you can even use two different tools to double check any figure you get.

    These tools ask for your various details about your car like make, model, mileage, and license plate number and perform a simple search to pull up a reasonable price, but they can’t account for everything so this will always be an approximation.

    HPI Check

    Car valuations are one of the many uses for a car history check. Unlike the other options you’ll have to pay a fee, but the cost is negligible, and the valuation will be based on a much more complete picture of your car, including its service history, optional extras and so forth.

    This means it will be much more accurate, and all the information will be pulled from databases meaning that the input you have to provide is a lot less than the other options on this list. This one is our recommendation if you want to get the best price for your car.

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  • First-Time Car Buyer Guide

    Resultat d'imatges de First-Time Car Buyer

    A Brief Guide for a First-Time Car Buyer

    For a first-time buyer, the prospect of buying a car can be daunting. With so much choice on the market and many finance options to choose from, it’s difficult to know where to start when buying your first car.

    We understand that a car can be a big expense, so here are three things you should consider before making your purchase.

    New or Used?

    The first thing you should think about is whether you want a new or used car. Used cars are often the more affordable choice for first-time buyers, but it depends what you’re looking for in a car. Consider what you’ll be using your new purchase for and whether cost or reliability is the most important factor for you.

    Don’t write off the option of a new car. Although you many think they aren’t financially valuable, if you do your research, you will be likely to find low-rate finance deals that could be within your budget.

    With a new car, you won’t have to experience roadside breakdowns or costly repair bills. Many also have improved safety features that can aid you with driving, such as electronic stability control, back-up cameras and sensors, park assist and lane departure warnings.

    How to Pay

    Many people choose to buy a used car so they can pay for it outright, which is perhaps the most cost-effective way to buy a car. However, if you can’t afford to do this then there are many finance options available, such as hire purchase or a car lease, which allow you to make fixed monthly payments on your car.

    Put some research into the finance options available and weigh up the pros and cons of each to decide which is best for your financial situation.

    Find the Best Deal

    Research has shown that different seasons can affect the price of a car. The best deals are often found at the end of the year, during the festive season. This period is in the middle of registration plate changes and it is also the best time to negotiate a good deal as car dealers will be trying to reach their quarterly sales targets.

    Don’t forget to look online when you’re searching for the best deals on your new car. Dealers such as Unbeatable Car have an extensive collection of new and used cars that can be viewed online and you can also check whether you are eligible for finance on their website.

    By following our three tips, you can take your first step on your journey to buying your first car. Whether you decide to buy a new or used car, you will be able to find a good deal if you take your time to put in the research and consider the season that you make your purchase.

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  • Options for Buying a Used Car

    With new car sales reaching record levels, the used car market is currently awash with vehicles including some real gems but buying a used car is, as it always has been, fraught with danger and great care is needed to avoid the pitfalls. The world it seems is full of used cars and so, after deciding on the make and model, it is time to get down to the serious business of car buying. Some of the car buying options are as follows:

    Buying from a Dealer

    This is the traditional way of car buying that has been around for as long as cars themselves. The main advantages of this method of car purchase are that a reputable dealer will have been able to thoroughly check the condition of the car and remedied any defects. It will also have been subjected to a check regarding any outstanding finance or previous insurance history. Some warranty is almost always available and trade sales are also subject to some legal protection. An added convenience is that a dealer will usually accept a trade-in vehicle and will also probably be able to help arrange with finance if required. The main problem with this type of sale is that the car will invariably be offered at “full book price” which is dictated by the motor trade publications. Most car dealers are completely trustworthy but it is still important to buy only from an established dealer with a good reputation.

    For buyers in the Greater London area there are some new and interesting options in the ‘dealer’ category.  The well known hire company ‘Hertz’ is now selling their used cars in London from several locations and the proposition of buying from such a well known entity comes with obvious trust and quality benefits.

    Buying from a Private Advertisement

    Private car ads can be found all over the place from cards in shop windows to local papers and sites such as Autotrader. The main advantage of buying in this way is that, by cutting out the middle-man, both the buyer and seller can end up getting a better deal but, from the buyer’s point of view, any initial savings can easily be overshadowed by huge costs only coming to light later. Private sales are not covered by the provisions of the Sale of Goods Act and the seller has no responsibility for any future faults or defects. Buyers are also strongly advised to pay for an HPI check in the same way that dealers do. Failure to do so could result in the purchase of a car that had previously suffered accident damage or, in the case of outstanding finance, the car could even be repossessed.

    Buying from the Internet

    Here we are entering dangerous territory. Internet sales sites such as eBay have revolutionised the way that we buy and sell and many second-hand items are identical so a bargain is easy to spot. Unfortunately the same cannot be said about cars. Anyone buying a used car needs to thoroughly inspect it in person, drive it and carry out all of the aforementioned checks regarding its legitimacy. Only then is it possible to determine what a fair price would be. All too often, bids are placed in an eBay auction based on the seller’s description and a few, often not very good, photos. The results of such folly are fairly predictable with many disappointments and uncompleted sales. Some people have managed to find some exceptional bargains in this way but it must be said that this is due more to good luck than good judgement.

    Buying from Car Auctions

    Auctions can be fun and prices can be completely unpredictable. Car auctions have previously been regarded as being strictly for the motor trade often used to dispose of vehicles regarded as being unsuitable for normal retail sale. Some vehicles may have faults and require some repair work attracting buyers capable of carrying out such work. Prices are generally well below the normal forecourt prices meaning that there is often the potential to make a profit on subsequent re-sales. The smart auction buyer will carry out plenty of research about the lots offered in the sale and some auction houses have sales of “end of lease” vehicles including some from the “Motability” scheme. Some such vehicles can be found in “as new” condition with very low mileages and are well worth considering. However, even when buying a very good car at auction, there is very little comeback if things go wrong later. Even when an auction lot is described as coming with a warranty this bears little resemblance to to that offered by a car dealer and will normally only be valid for a period of one hour after the completion of the auction. This gives the purchaser the chance to quickly drive and thoroughly inspect the car before the sale becomes absolute.

    So used car buying is not for the faint hearted. Those with little experience or mechanical aptitude are best sticking with a reputable dealership. The more mechanically minded may prefer to seek out a bargain but whatever buying option is chosen it is always wise to remember the buying mantra Caveat Emptor … Let the buyer beware!

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  • Looking Back at the Best Cars of 2016

    2016 may have been a bad year for many things, but one area that hasn’t felt its icy touch is the auto industry. We’ve put together a list of a few of the best vehicles to hit the road this year and why we think they’re worth looking at if you’re in the market for something new.

    Audi A5 Sportback

    A compact executive saloon that’s stylish enough to impress at both business and social occasions with a lush interior and improved fuel efficiency? Sign us up. With performance on top of that in the form of a smooth, refined ride and monstrous acceleration this is a definite buy, and if the £38,000 plus price tag is a little outside of your price range it won’t be too long before dealers like AA Cars are wheeling out this newest model at a fraction of the price.

    Honda Fit

    Considering all the bells and whistles it comes with, the Fit’s price of just under £20,000 feels fair. As well as a rear view camera, this stylish subcompact is surprisingly spacious for how little space it takes up on the road. Not to mention, it handles like a dream and gets fuel economy, making it a great option for first-timers.

    Hyundai i10

    Coming in at under £11,000 is What Car?’s winner of the best city car of the year, the i10. It’s roomy enough for any task you turn it to, its fuel economy is through the roof, and it looks good to boot, making it a great car for any driver.

    Skoda Superb

    Once upon a time they were the butt of many a joke, but since VW took ownership of Skoda they’ve really turned things around and this year’s Superb is the culmination of all that effort. It’s comfortable, powerful, economical to run and even cheap to buy—affordability has never stopped being a priority for this brand.

    Volkswagen Passat Estate GTE

    Speaking of VW, their showing is perhaps the best electric car of the year. The distance it can cover on electricity alone is an impressive twenty miles and the space and handling it provides means it makes a great family or business car.

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