• 2017 Peugeot Django 125i Switches to EasyMotion

    The 2017 Peugeot Django 125i continues to offer a vintage look with modern technology. And for this year, that tech will include the new fuel injected 125cc EasyMotion engine and Syncho Braking Concept (SBC) linked brakes.

    2017 Peugeot Django 125i Evasion Easymotion
    The 2017 Pegueot Django 125i Evasion

    Most new Peugeot scooters are being moved across to the new fuel-injected motor to meet Euro4 emission rules. For example, the horribly-named Tweet also has the same engine. In the case of the retro-style 2017 Peugeot Django 125i, that means around 100 miles per gallon. Under World Motorcycle Test Cycle Conditions, it managed 104mpg. That’s helped by the engine switch not having much effect on the 135kg weight, or the 7.5kW (10hp) output.

    2017 Peugeot Django 125i Allure Easymotion
    The 2017 Peugeot Django 125i Allure tops the range

    The 2017 Peugeot Django 125i also shares the SBC braking system with a number of other scooters from the French manufacturer, including the racier Speedfight4 125. When you apply the left lever, you activate the SBC, which distributes the braking between the 200mm front disc brake and 170mm rear disc. Which should slow you down quickly, without locking the wheels. Or having the front dive like a Premier League footballer.

    If you need to stop any more quickly, then add the right-hand lever for extra power. Obviously there’s no need for a clutch lever with an automatic scooter.

    Although those are two sizeable changes under the surface, the Django has generally stayed pretty unchanged from the outside. You still get a look inspired by the vintage 1950s Peuegot S55. And a mix that incluces an analogue speedo with a digital displayer, for example. Or retro chrome trim with LED indicators, rear and signature lights around the front grille. The under seat lockable storage bay will easily store your retro open-face helmet, but the glove compartment has a 12v socket for your smartphone.

    2017 Peugeot Django 125i S Sport Easymotion
    The coolest of the 2017 Peugeot Django 125i range has to be the matt black S model

    2017 Peugeot Django 125i Model Range:

    If you’re interested in picking up a Peugeot for learning, commuting or as your main transport, then there are 5 different model levels you can choose from.

    • Heritage: Single colours,white wheels and round chrome mirrors.
    • Sport: Grey wheel rims and sport numbers. Dual seat has removable passenger seat shell and chrome hand-grip.
    • S: – based around the Sport, with matt black body panels and colour-matched passenger seat shell. Wheels, fork legs and engine cover are all painted black, with contrasting satin chrome finish on the trim, mirror covers and headlamp peak.
    • Evasion: Two-tone colours, with white wheel rims and white-wall tyres. Painted rear-view mirrors have a chrome surround. Fly screen and chrome front luggage rack are standard equipment.
    • Allure: Two-tone bodywork, grey wheel rims, white-wall tyres and three-tone dual seat. Painted mirrors with chrome surround. Fly screen, colour-match top-case, passenger back-rest and chrome rear luggage rack as standard equipment

    Prices start at £2,799 for a Heritage version, and all of them comes with two-year-unlimited mileage parts and labour warranty. Obviously the matt black S is the coolest, because matt black. We’re not joking – the fact the wheels, forks and engine cover are also black makes it look like it’s going racing in the 1960s. It’s definitely the one we’d pick!

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  • 10 Tips to Keep Your Car Engine in Perfect Condition

    Automotive technology is constantly improving and modern cars are often capable of clocking up more miles than could ever have been dreamt of in the past coupled with ever-increasing service intervals. It almost seems as though we can now simply forget about engine maintenance. Of course, nothing could be further from the truth and keeping an engine in perfect working order requires rather more than good luck! There are a few simple measures that go a long way towards keeping the engine running well, lasting longer and with reduced risk of breakdown.

    1. Frequently Check Oil Levels – This may sound absurdly obvious but it is surprising how many drivers fail to carry out this most basic of all checks. Many cars offer electronic checks of oil levels but these are often wildly inaccurate and only give warning at a very low level. There is no substitute for regular checks on the dipstick.

    2. Change Oil Frequently – The manufacturer’s recommended period between oil changes should be regarded as an absolute maximum figure. Any car subjected to many short journeys or extended periods of high-speed driving will benefit from more frequent changes.

    3. Use Good Quality Oil – Car manufacturers invariably specify suitable grades of oil but even cars for which the lowlier grades are said to suffice will benefit from the use of synthetic or semi-synthetic oils which maintain their viscosity over a wide range of temperatures.

    4. Check Coolant Levels – This is another check that is often overlooked until it is too late. Electronic monitoring of levels is unreliable and waiting until the system overheats often means that major damage has already been done. Obviously, antifreeze should be of the correct concentration and type. Under no circumstances should different types be mixed.

    5. Check the Condition of Belts – Drive belts are an unavoidable feature of car engines powering auxiliary items such as alternators, power steering or air-con. A simple visual inspection and the renewal of any showing signs of wear can help to avoid a future breakdown. For those engines employing belt-driven camshafts, cam-belt failure can be catastrophic. Manufacturers usually specify cam-belt replacement intervals but many breakages still occur within these periods so the best recommendation is to change these belts much more frequently possibly at half of the quoted recommended mileage.

    6. Change Filters Regularly – Oil and air filters lose inefficiency as they are used and so it is essential to change them regularly.

    7. Use the Correct Grade of Fuel – Many cars are designed to run on standard grades of petrol and using a higher octane fuel offers no advantages. Other cars may require a high octane fuel and a lower grade can potentially cause problems such as pre-ignition and overheating. Many others are able to utilise different grades with no risk of damage in which case the higher octane fuels usually offer better performance and efficiency.

    8. Do Not Disregard Engine Warnings – Almost all cars feature a system of on-board diagnostics and any fault usually results in the illumination of a dashboard display lamp. Many drivers regard these warnings as a nuisance and there can be a tendency to ignore them especially when they display intermittently. This is folly and any warning messages must be investigated.

    9. Check for Fluid Leaks – A visual check of the engine compartment should be made for any signs of leaks. Any fluid leak is potentially very serious and should be remedied without delay. Any signs of coolant, lubricant, fuel or hydraulic fluid could all be warnings of impending disaster. Perhaps the only insignificant fluid leak is the dripping of condensation from an air-conditioning system.

    10. Engine-Friendly Driving – Adopting a considerate driving style can reap benefits in terms of running costs and engine longevity. Engines should be treated carefully when cold and warmed up by driving gently rather than by idling for a long period.

    There is a well-known adage of “If it ain’t broke don’t fix it!” but this should never form the basis of a maintenance schedule. You certainly would not want your favourite airline to adopt such a policy so why should any motorist? If you can maintain your car correctly then you have the option to browse used cars for sale as well as new ones, in safe knowledge you are able to keep it ticking over in a healty and well maintained way.

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  • Classic Look for the Weise Brunel Leather Motorcycle Jacket

    No matter what changes, there are some constants in motorcycling. And one of those is the need for a decent leather jacket with works when you’re riding – and in the pub. The new Weise Brunel leather motorcycle jacket seems to offer a decent attempt at both jobs for a reasonable £239.99.

    2017 Weise Brunel Leather Motorcycle Jacket
    The Weise Brunel Jacket

    The full-grain cowhide has been waxed to resist moisture and dry more quickly than untreated leather. Which will be handy if you’re caught in the rain. Or someone spills their pint on you.

    And it’s been designed and cut in a retro style, with leather overlay on the shoulders and elbows. The cuffs feature zip-fastening and there are adjustable tabs at the bottom of the jacket, secured by poppers. There’s also an 8-inch connecting zip for Weise trousers. And the only Weise branding is pretty subtle on the front of the jacket.

    2017 Weise Brunel Leather Motorcycle Jacket Rear Cream

    The classic look does contain modern protection. The Brunel has level 2 CE-approved protectors at the shoulders and elbows, and comes complete with a CE-approved Level 1 back protector. And by using flexible Elastofoam, the armour is low profile and curves to fit in a comfortable way. Although that might mean it’s less effective for elbowing the crowds aside when last orders has been called.

    2017 Weise Brunel Leather Motorcycle Jacket Front Orange

    The Weise Brunel leather motorcycle jacket features the traditional three pockets on the outside. And also zipped internal pockets. The colours available are the Black/Cream, Black/Orange and Black/Red.

    2017 Weise Brunel Leather Motorcycle Jacket Front Red

    Sizes are from 40″ to 50″ chests. We’ll presume that’s blokes only for the time being. And all the Weise range is covered by a two-year no-quibble warranty, which is pretty decent. If you want something to get you through the rare summer months in reasonable style the Weise Brunel leather motorcycle jacket seems worth considering. And it’s decent enough value at £239.99. Which should leave you some cash for petrol and non-alcholic refreshment.

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  • Subaru BRZ review

    Subaru BRZ review

    The Subaru BRZ is one of the best kept secrets of the auotmotive world.

    Developed alongisde the near-identical Toyota GT86, it’s an affordable back-to-basics front
    engined, rear-wheel drive 2+2 sports coupe.

    For 2017, Subaru has given the evergreen BRZ a mid-life facelift, equipment upgrade and distilled the trim options down to just one – SE Lux.

    Subaru BRZ review

    The exterior design tweaks are subtle, apart from the old school aerodynamic wing at the rear. Elsewhere, there’s a new front bumper, LED headlights and 10-spoke 17-inch alloys.

    You can choose from five colours, though Subaru’s iconic WR (World Rally) Blue Pearl is surely the one to go for.

    Inside, a 4.2-inch LCD colour display is added to the instrument display, featuring such sporting essentials as a G-Force meter and braking gauge.

    Subaru BRZ review

    The leather steering wheel is now smaller and boasts audio controls, while plastics generally have been upgraded or replaced by leather, giving the cabin a more upmarket feel.

    The Alcantra and leather seats are more comfortable than ever (the driver’s seat has a six-way adjustment), while a 6.2-inch touchscreen has been added to the centre console, though sat nav is a £1,250 option.

    The infotainment system is not as hi-tech as the best of them, but it does the job and, of course, offers full connectivity.

    Subaru BRZ review

    Traditionalists will be pleased to note that the cockpit is still adorned with plenty of retro-feel knobs and toggle switches.

    The rear passenger seats are fitted with ISOFIX anchor points, but as with most 2+2s, they are
    almost totally useless. Better news in the boot where there’s 243 litres of space available – 1,270 with the rear seats folded flat.

    The 2017 Subaru BRZ is more driver focused than ever. Sadly, there’s no extra power for the 2.0-
    litre 200PS ‘Boxer’ petrol engine, but it is more responsive, it still sounds suitably throaty and CO2 emissions are slightly lower.

    Subaru BRZ review

    Elsewhere, Subaru’s engineers have made various changes (to the steering, suspension, dampers and
    brakes) to tweak the driving dynamics and make the BRZ even sharper than before.

    Priced from £26,050, the BRZ is one of the most entertaining cars you’ll find for that money.

    The chassis is better than ever and it’s enormous fun on flowing country roads. Agile and engaging, it’s helped by a slick six-speed short-throw manual gearbox and it feels totally
    planted.

    Subaru BRZ review

    For the record, the BRZ is capable of 0-62mph in 7.6 seconds (but feels faster) and it tops out at 140mph. Fuel economy is a claimed 36.2mpg (and it not far off that in the real world), while CO2 emissions are a very average 180g/km.

    But here’s the thing. The BRZ is also now available with automatic transmission – and it’s a bit of a revelation.

    Subaru BRZ review

    It may sounds like sacrilege in a sports car package like this, but the auto box slams through the gears pretty well – even producing the odd pop on down-changes, allowing you to concentrate on the driving. The engine even sounds more sporty.

    Verdict: The new, improved Subaru BRZ is better than ever. With a mild makeover inside and out, plus enhanced driving dynamics, it has to be one of the best-value, most entertaining sports cars
    on the market – and it still looks just as cool.

    Review by Gareth Herincx

    Subaru BRZ review

    The post Subaru BRZ review appeared first on Automotive Blog.

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  • Want to Win a 2017 KTM RC 390 for Free?

    KTM would like you to sign up for their monthly newsletter. In fact, they really, really want you to sign up. So much so, that you can win a 2017 KTM RC 390 if you do.

    And it’s probably worth doing. Not only has the RC 390 received a range of updates for this year, but it’s also worth £5,099. Improvements to the bike include a new ride-by-wire throttle which aims to give smoother and more efficient power. You also get a larger front disc with a radial four-piston caliper and ABS. Plus a new power-assisted slipper clutch (PASC). The single-cylinder KTM also has a side-mounted exhaust from this year, we’re not sure that’s necessarily better than the underbelly version on previous bikes.

    Win a 2017 KTM RC 390

    The other changes include span-adjustable levers, wider rear view mirrors and a more comfortable race-style passenger seat.

    OK, so they’ll probably get quite a few people signing up to their monthly email when there’s an RC 390 as a potental reward. And you won’t get the chance to be selected until sometime after the competition closes on 26th November 2017. By which time, the model for next year will probably be on stands at various motorcycle shows. But it’s still the chance to win a free bike.

    2017 KTM RC 390

    To enter, you need to sign up at www.ktm.com/gb/newsletter/. You’ll also need to be 18 or over, and have a full A, A1 or A2 motorcycle licence and be responsible for sorting your own insurance etc once the bike gets sent to your nearest dealer.

    You’ll also need to remember to check your email after the closing date. Which means using a fake email address you never check probably isn’t the best idea. But given the number of UK motorcyclists who haven’t already signed up, the odds are still better than the lottery. And who wouldn’t want to win a 2107 KTM RC 390 for nothing?

    As cynical as we are, we certainly wouldn’t complain. Although the fact we know the KTM PR people probably means they’ll spot our email address.

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