• QUAIL MOTORCYCLE GATHERING: BEST OF THE BEST!

    Cool temperatures fail to lower motorcycle fever at the Quail and keep Jim Palam from delivering this photo report.

    Low temperatures, brisk winds and overcast skies did nothing to dampen the spirits of over 3,000 visitors to the 2017 Quail Motorcycle Gathering on May 6 at the beautiful Quail Lodge & Golf Club in Carmel, CA.

    Gordon McCall, motorsports director for the Quail Lodge, was once again the perfect ringleader for this 9th Annual gathering. It featured over 300 rare and historic bikes, as well as a generous sampling of custom and modified rides from some of the rising stars in the motorcycle enthusiast’s expanding universe. GEICO Motorcycles presented the event.

    Jim Palam, our man (and Triumph rider) on the West Coast was up and out early to capture the action. The show was so good that he forgot to eat his complimentary gourmet lunch – but he did take a big bite of The Gathering’s tasty essence – yours now to enjoy.

    Taking the Design and Style Award was Simon Waterfall’s super-clean and serious ‘75 Moto Guzzi 850T, Top, rebadged as Supernaturale. Designed and built by Hugo Eccler of Untitled Motorcycles of San Francisco (pictured) the bike features a custom aluminum tank, advanced electronics and fingertip controls. Its overall brushed satin finish will intentionally age gracefully, developing an individualized patina from the way the rider handles the bike.

    What do you do if you have a beautiful old Triumph race tank? If you’re Californian Bryan Thompson you build the quintessential ‘58 Triumph Tiger from ground up, around the tank. So good is this build that this Black Beauty has been racking up a bounty of awards – including First Place in the Quail’s Custom/Modified category. Well-done Bryan!

    Chris Carter has become almost as famous as the spectacular motorcycles in his amazing All Things Two Wheels collection. So thanks Chris for bringing your gorgeous ‘14 Jefferson Board Track Racer to The Gathering. It took 2nd Place in the American category.

    Considered one of the most innovative motorcycles ever created, only 10 hand-crafted Britten V1000 superbikes were ever built. This Britten, #10, resides in the Solvang Vintage Motorcycle Museum, just a few blocks from my home. It belongs to the museum’s owner Virgil Elings and he proudly displayed it at The Gathering. Virgil’s son Jeff rode it up onto the winner’s ramp to accept the Significance in Racing Award.

    I met Richard Mitchell as he was rolling this meticulously customized BSA A65 Thunderbolt up to the Entrant’s Window late Friday afternoon. When Richard is not designing for Tesla, his passion is motorcycles. His beautiful creation went on to win 2nd Place in the Custom/Modified category.

    Ole #38 didn’t look like much when from a distance when I spotted owner Gary Landeen trying to kick-start her for a bevy of patient judges. On what was surely his last kick she fired up – and like the menacing roar of a Coliseum lion she fired up the crowd as well! This bike is the legendary Ed “Iron Man” Kretz’s Pre-War Big Base Indian Scout FDB 381 that competed successfully on a national level from 1941 through 1967. What a thrill to see and hear #38 roar at The Gathering!

    Two For The Road! If you’re a Motorhead you find beauty in design, function and performance. So forgive me if my heart beats a little faster when I take in the sexy symmetry of John Stein’s ‘70 Twin Motor BSA drag bike – bared for all to see in the Competition On Road Class.

    The 750 Sport was essentially a racier version of Ducati’s first big V-Twin, the 750GT. Its Goldenrod Yellow and black paint scheme and lean, aggressive styling made this Italian beauty really stand out from the crowd. Robert Jordon owns this stunning and pristine example.

    Wake Me Up Before You Goggo! The Hans Glas GMBH Company of Germany produced the Goggo Motorscooter in the 1950s. They were dependable and offered better performance than their Italian counterparts. They were however a bit pricier and few ever made it to the States. Harley and Deb Welch brought this nifty ‘55 Goggo 150 to The Gathering.

    And now for something different: The ‘76 Hercules W2000. Powered by an air-cooled, single-rotor Sachs-designed Wankel engine, it was manufactured in Germany. Innovative for sure, but criticized for its high cost, insufficient ground clearance and low performance. And of course, now, in high-demand by collectors! Congratulations to Stephan Haddad for the bike’s 2nd Place win in the Other European category.

    Words & photos by Jim Palam, http://www.jimpalam.com/

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  • ’59 STINGRAY: TRIBUTE TO A MASTERPIECE!

    It’s “the Sting of Inspiration’ blogs CarGuyChronicles’ Jim Palam, who succumbed to the magnetic appeal of the Fiberfab Centurion.

    Bill Mitchell’s real XP-87 Stingray, top, photographed with two other Corvette legends – SR-2 and the iconic Grand Sport coupe – by Marty Schorr at the GM Proving Ground. Jim Palam’s photo of the Fiberfab Centurion, above.

    In 1959 GM design chief Bill Mitchell wasn’t buying into the ban on manufacturer-sponsored racing proposed by the Automobile Manufacturers Association. He assembled a team of designers, headed up by Tony Lapine and working with Larry Shinoda, Chuck Pohlman and Gene Garfinkle, working on the XP-87 project in his secret “Hammer Room” studio. Peter Brock had worked on the XP-87 design prior to the team being assembled and he moved on to another Corvette Concept.

    The XP-87 competition roadster is the forefather of the legendary C-2 Sting Ray Corvette. After Mitchell chose to retire his beautiful, race-tested Concept, many felt the ’63 Sting Ray wasn’t quite filling the XP-87 void.

    So Fiberfab’s Warren “Bud” Goodwin’s decided to seize the opportunity to resurrect the XP-87 concept by building the Fiberfab Centurion in 1965. 

The example I discovered at Rick Cole Auctions in Monterey is 1 of only 8-12 Centurions produced between 1965 and 1966. With obvious design inspiration from Mitchell’s XP-87, this Inca-Silver Centurion sits on a ’58 Corvette chassis and features dual head-rest fairings, a Rochester FI 283 motor, 4-speed transmission and a 4.11 Posi rear. The Centurion body was designed and engineered to fit on any C-1 Corvette chassis

    While there was plenty of buzz about this car during Car Week 2016, a high bid of $175,000 wasn’t quite enough to reel-in this radical roadster. Ultimately, GM halted production of this kit car, claiming ’58 Stingray Racer patent infringement.

     

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  • HOT CARS, HOT SALES, HOT PANTS!

    Jim Palam delivers some auction sizzle from Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas, 2016.

    With more than $32.5-million in total sales, the Barrett-Jackson 2016 auction machine, October 13-15 at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, was cookin’ with high-octane. If you missed the show or the extensive television coverage, here’s a look at some hot picks from Car Guy Chronicle’s correspondent on the Left Coast.

    Originally a Shriner’s Parade vehicle, this restored ‘23 Dodge Graham chemical fire truck, top, now sports a shiny fire bell and blown 426 Hemi motor. Hammer Price: $93,500. Bombshell Betty is a ‘52 Buick Super Riviera racecar that holds six World Land Speed Records. A brutish ‘50 Buick Straight-8 powers this Steampunk hottie with a rocket-induction custom intake manifold from Hart’s Collision-Racing Shop. Hammer Price: $36,300.

    No clowning around: Hot Rod Circus is a not-so-tame ’30 Ford Model A custom coupe built in Finland by Heath Garage and captured by Richard Rawlings for a Barrett-Jackson flip via Gas Monkey Garage. Hammer Price: $49,500.

    Q: What do you get when the gang at Intense Automotive Design rebuilds a 550-horsepower Mosler MT900S Supercar? A: The IAD 2,500-horsepower Twin-Turbo Land Shark – capable of a sizzling 0-150 mph in 6.7 seconds. Wind tunnel and computer tests show a possible top speed of 375 mph! Hammer Price: The auction’s #4 top seller at $220,000.

    How hot is this custom ‘65 Plymouth Belvedere Wagon? Hot enough to make the cover of Hot Rod Magazine – and cool enough to run a Vortec supercharged 360 Magnum engine.
    Hammer Price: $22,000.

    Fordvergnügen: The fun you have spending over $90,000 and 2 years customizing a ‘75 VW Super Beetle convertible! Features include a 1,835-cc engine, radiant PPG Metallic Orange Glow paint, and frenched ’39 Ford headlights and taillights. Hammer Price: $20,900.

    Light My Fire! Here’s a flammable combination: Drop a 550-horsepower Chevy engine in an all-steel ‘49 Ford Anglia custom coupe. Add a Demon carb, TCI Turbo 350 trans and a 9-inch Ford rear. Wrap it all up in a blaze of fiery paint and hit the ignition! Hammer Price: $39,600.

    Remember Hot Pants? These slivers of 1970s style are alive and well in Vegas, Baby.
    Hammer Price: Undisclosed.

    How to cool down: Three days of Auction Fever can leave you punchy and parched. Thank goodness this cleverly restored ‘26 Boyle-Dalton visible gas pump was on the floor and customized into a one-of-a-kind Texaco beer pump. Hammer Price: $10,925.

    Words & Photos: Jim Palam, http://www.jimpalam.com/
    For more information about Barrett-Jackson auctions, please visit http://www.barrett-jackson.com/Events/Event/Home/Scottsdale-2017/5a0b6fec-3238-4bae-baba-7d93140cba83

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