• IR X RM Outback Motorcycle Shoes – Ridgemont Outfitters & Iron Resin

    The IR X RM Outback motorcycle shoes are an interesting collaboration between two South California clothing companies. Ridgemont Outfitters has produced boots and shoes for a while, while Iron and Resin sell a range of clothing for motorcyclists, skaters, and surfers. So now they’ve teamed up to produce something that looks good and works well for bikers.

    IR X RM Outback Motorcycle Shoes Ridgemont Outfitters and Iron Resin

    The IR X RM Motorcycle Shoes

    The result is the IR X RM Outback, which features genuine Horween full-grain leather sourced from their Chicago tannery. The main upper uses 2.5mm thick pieces in the construction, along with a super soft and durable oiled suede collar.

    In terms of practicality, the toe cap has been extended compared to normal Ridgemont boots to give protection from gear shift levers. And they’ve done the same on both boots to accomodate anyone with their shifter on the right side, for instance, vintage British bikes.

    On the bottom is a Vari-flex Bi Fit lasting board, which apparently has been stiffened from the heel to the middle of the foot in case you still have to deal with a kickstart. But the front is flexible enough for walking.

    There’s more protection with an internal nylon malleolus protector hidden in the suede collar to help look after your ankles, and a thermal plastic heel counter.

    IR X RM Outback Motorcycle Shoes Ridegmont Outfitters Iron Resin Diagram

    A photo of the IR X RM Outback motorcycle shoes. With some words and lines on it

    So here’s where it gets even more interesting. The existing Ridgemont line are reasonably priced for both the UK and US. But the companies have decided to test the demand for the new IR X RM Outback motorcycle shoes by running a Kickstarter campaign.

    If you’re not familiar with Kickstarter, it’s actually not bike-related. It’s what’s known as a ‘crowdfunding’ site, where interested backers can invest in a future product in advance, and usually get something extra for their support. Each project has a limited time to reach a set goal, and if it succeeds, they get your money, make the products and ship them to you. If they don’t reach the goal, then you don’t pay.

    There is a slight caveat to that, as you’re investing in a project rather than pre-ordering a product, and some risks are involved. But basically, you can invest and get a pair of shoes in your choice of Black or Brown Horween leather for $165, which is 45% off the planned normal retail price of $295. And $200 gets you a pair of shoes, a T-shirt and a leather key chain. The estimated delivery is June 2017.

    If you interested, the Iron and Resin by Ridgemont Outback Riding Shoes Campaign aims to hit $60,000, and ends on Saturday, February 18th, 2017. Each of the discount packages is limited to the first 100 or 200 backers. The IR X RM Outback Motorcycle Shoe will be produced in US mens sizes 5-12 with half size increments, and also a size 13, in a medium width. T-Shirts are in sizes XS-XXL.

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  • What Protects You While You’re Driving?

    Whether you’re working on it, walking on it or driving on it, staying safe on the road is essential. But what are the driving devices and roadway essentials which help to keep everyone safe on UK roads?

    In the Vehicle

    Automobile safety is an integral part of modern car design and a real focus for manufacturers. New innovations and improved systems continue to be developed in line with technological advances, with many safety devices now being incorporated as standard into cars:

    • Anti-lock braking systems (ABS) – this system prevents the wheels from locking during heavy braking, to help drivers to maintain control of vehicle. This helps ensure more effective stopping within average stopping distances and particularly upon skid-likely surfaces, such as wet roads or in icy conditions.
    • Electronic stability control – this system is the next up generation from ABS and includes a system of traction control. This corrects driver error by stablising the vehicle and reducing the risk of the driver losing control of the vehicle, for example in a skid. This system varies between vehicle manufacturers and may also be known as vehicle stability control.
    • Brake assist – this system ensures that maximum pressure is exerted when brakes are applied in an emergency. As manual emergency braking sometimes fails because drivers may depress the brake pedal insufficiently, so the brakes fail to engage on the wheels, brake assist technology assesses how quickly the brake has been applied and identifies if it’s likely to be an emergency. If it judges so, then brakes are fully applied via the hydraulic pressure system.
    • Lane keeping and adaptive steering – this system is a branch of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) which provides benefits such as cruise control. However, lane keeping and adaptive steering systems put greater emphasis on safety rather than comfort, specifically through aiming to maintain a vehicle’s correct position on the road by utilising lane markings at the side of the car. Any deviation from the correct position and the system alerts the driver so that correction can be made manually. Future development of this system proposes that it will work similarly to brake assist, with the system making the correction automatically.

    Many versions of these technologies are already fitted to modern vehicles and continue to be developed as part of a deal to provide better protection for road users, including pedestrians.

    On the road

    Roadways and surfaces themselves also incorporate safety devices for speed control, accident prevention and risk management:

    • Road humps – also known as sleeping policemen to reflecting their more manual speed-prevention origins, road humps aim to deter speeding by preventing vehicles from speeding up along flat roads. Road humps are commonly found in residential areas, but not main bus routes as the hump height causes passenger discomfort. The humps need to be spaced fairly close together to be effective and must be accompanied by relevant signage at each end of the hump run.
    • Rumble strips – this is the name given to a variegated road surface which is generally applied as a layer to the roadway. When reaching this stretch of the road, the driver is immediately alerted to the need to adhere to speed limits, through the in-car feedback from the suspension and driving wheel, which will sound and feel different, specifically with a low rumble. With their specific aim to alert drivers to reduce their speeds, rumble strips can often be found at the edges of vulnerable roadsides, on the approach to junctions and where faster sections of A roads enter residential areas. Rumble strips tend to be used in outlying areas of towns and villages as they literally sound as they are named and the rumble of a steady stream of traffic can cause a noise-nuisance to residents.  This road safety device is also deployed as transverse rumble strips, which run across the whole carriageway rather than just alongside it, whilst an additional version, known as Dragon’s Teeth, is applied along with a visible narrowing of the road, to also support accident prevention.
    • Speed cushions – as an alternative to road humps, speed cushions are a speed control method developed to cause standard vehicles to slow down, but allow emergency vehicle and public transport drivers through safely at normal speeds. Speed cushions offer an optimum size and placement so that smaller vehicles have to slow down to drive over the cushions, but buses and emergency vehicles are able to straddle the cushions and proceed normally. Cushions are generally installed at regular intervals along the roadway where speed reduction is required, such as in the neighbourhood of schools or pedestrian areas.
    • Pedestrian safety – pedestrians are encouraged to cross roads safely using designated zones such as crossings and traffic island refuges, which are highly visible to traffic.

    Roadside safety

    Roadside safety is additionally important as it needs to respond to the needs of road workers, as well as the public and road users. The mainstay of roadside safety is crash barriers, which tend to be deployed with safety and risk reduction, rather than speed reduction in mind.

    • Safety barriers – permanent motorway and roadside barriers aim to minimise risk through containment: keeping an errant vehicle on its own side of the carriageway. This method does include the risk of impact and crash injuries to the driver, but with the effect of preventing the vehicle from advancing to the other side of the barrier where there may be a greater hazard. As such, permanent safety barriers are installed only when it presents less risk for an errant vehicle to strike the barrier than to continue onwards at speed.  Permanent barriers of flexible steel construction have frequently been used to facilitate containment, but many have proven vulnerable over time. As such, there is a current move by the Highways Agency to replace many steel barriers with concrete barriers to increase containment, particularly where installed as a central reservation barrier.
    •  Temporary barriers – one example of a temporary barrier solution is the MASS (Multi-Use Safety System) barrier. MASS barriers are designed to actively absorb the impact of a vehicle and use this to stabilise the barrier, both reducing the vehicle’s speed and deflecting the vehicle along the barrier line. Because MASS barriers offer a stable but non-permanent fixing, they are quick and easy to install and reposition at short notice to keep users on all sides of the barrier safe.

    Finally, as these innovations continue to develop and change, one of the simplest road safety devices which is essential is road safety awareness: being aware of the roadway environment, conditions, restrictions and changes is a key way to make best use of all road safety devices and to help keep all road users safe.

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  • New Weise Outlast Houston Motorcycle Jacket

    If you’re looking for an armoured, waterproof, textile motorcycle jacket, it’s worth checking out the new Weise Outlast Houston, which is new for 2017.

    Outlast material was originally developed for NASA to assist astronauts. It does this by absorbing, storing and releasing heat when needed. Essentially it’s a load of capsules inside your clothing which change from solid to liquid and back again depending on the temperature. So while you won’t expect to encounter the sub-zero conditions of space, or the sudden sensation of being in direct sunlight in a vacuum, it should help in changeable conditions on your commute to work.

    The Weise Outlast Houston textile motorcycle jacket

    The Weise Outlast Houston textile motorcycle jacket

    In addition to the Outlast lining, you also get vents on the arms, chest and back for those times when the weather gets warmer.

    The Weise Outlast Houston also has a tough, tear-resistant rip-stop outer with a waterproof and breathable lining. And to stop the rain getting in is a YKK central zip, plus a popper and Velcro storm flap.

    Weise Outlast Houston Back Weise Outlast Houston Front

    You get CE-approved armour at the shoulders, elbows and back. Plus there are a number of pockets both inside and outside the jacket, including a large map pocket at the back.

    Weise Outlast Houston Modelled

    The Weise Outlast Houston motorcycle jacket is available in sizes Small-5XL in Black and Medium-3XL in Black/Stone, with a 2 year ‘no-quibble’ guarantee for £159.99.

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  • New Knox Nexos Sport Touring Motorcycle Gloves

    The new Knox Nexos Sport Touring motorcycle gloves look like a stylish way to protect yourself this year. They’ve got relatively subtle logos and details, so you’re not limited to wearing them on the latest sports bike or looking like a bit of a plank. But at the same time, they’ve got all the armour and specs that you might expect by now.

    Knox Nexos Sport Touring motorcycle gloves in Black and White

    The Knox Nexos are made from tough cowhide leather uppers, with softer, more flexible goatskin on the palms. You also get elasticated stretch panels at the finger joints. So there should be plenty of feel and flexibility. The fingers also have seamless, wrap-around ends, which means less pain from an annoying join digging into the end of your pinkies.

    To keep the gloves secure on your hands, you get the latest L6 Boa closure system and wrist support, which means they’re consistently fastened and micro-adjustable. So that means you can get them nice and comfy, but also shouldn’t have them come loose or undone if you’re unlucky enough to have an accident.

    Knox Nexos Sport Touring motorcycle gloves in Black

    On the top of the glove is a three-part kuckle guard built from memory foam and impact-absorbing honeycomb gel under a soft, deformable TPU kuckle shield. So you get protection without having hard plastic either making it hard to move your hands, or digging into them. And you also get the patented Knox Scaphoid Protection System to protect your wrist bones and prevent hyperextension when sliding – there are also sliders built into the top of the fingers.

    The Knox Nexos Sport Touring motorcycle gloves are available in either Black/White or solid Black. The plain colour in particular means you won’t stand out wearing them on any road bike, including a classic or a modern retro. The only real indicator that they’re a new glove is that closure system. And the problem of saying Knox Nexos quickly 20 times. The Nexos are available in sizes Small-XXL, and will cost you £129.99.

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  • Buffalo Children’s Motorcycle Kit

    The choice of what level of protection you need from motorcycle clothing generally comes down to personal preference for adults. If you’ve reached a reasonable age, ridden for a while, and want to ride in T-shirt, shorts and trainers, ultimately that’s down to you. But it certainly doesn’t apply to children, especially when options like the Buffalo children’s motorcycle kit make it relatively inexpensive to kit them out.

    Not only does it cost under £130 to sort a child with a jacket, trousers and gloves, but they’re also designed with adjustable sleeves and legs to help them accommodate a bit of growth. And even when you add the cost of a suitable helmet, you’re still looking at less than the cost of the latest games console.

    The Buffalo Ranger Children’s Jacket is a versatile waterproof textile number with front and rear vents, plus a removable thermal liner. There’s CE-approved armour at the shoulders and elbows. And the fit can be tailored to each child with adjustable Velcro straps at the cuffs, upper and lower arms and waist.

    Buffalo Ranger Childrens Motorcycle Jacket Black

    There are also expansion zips on the sleeves to make them longer as your child grows. So you should get a decent amount of use from the Buffalo Ranger before you need to get a larger size. The jacket also has reflective details, and both internal and external pockets to stuff with sweets, pebbles and everything else the typical child accumulates.

    Buffalo Ranger Childrens Motorcycle Jacket Black Neon

    The Buffalo Ranger is available in sizes XS (6-7 years) to XL (13-14 years), and comes in either Black or Black/Neon Yellow. It costs £59.99.

    Also available are the matching Buffalo Imola Textile Trousers, in the same XS-XL sizes. They feature the same waterproof textile, and include Thermomix insulation and a removable quilted lining. The knees get CE-approved armour, and again, you can use the expansion zip system to fit longer legs as time goes by. The Buffalo Imola in kid’s sizes cost £46.99.

    Buffalo Imola Childrens Motorcycle Trousers Black

    Finally there are the Buffalo Tracker Gloves which come in Junior sizes S-L in Black, Red or Blue. They’re made from suede leather and textile with a twin overlay on the knuckles and palm. Waterproof, windproof and breathable, they also have a thermal lining and a Velcro-retained wrist strap to keep them on. Plus a pull cord to stop rain getting in the top and leading to a pair of small, cold hands and complaints. The Buffalo Tracker Gloves cost £18.99.

    Buffalo Tracker Childrens Motorcycle Gloves

    Other options are available, but the Buffalo children’s motorcycle kit shows that it doesn’t have to be expensive to kit out a youngster. And that’s important when a 7 or 8-year-old has little concept of danger, gravel rash or how to question their safety if a parent is taking them out for a pillion ride.

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