• NASCAR: HOW TO SAVE TRUCK RACING!

    NASCAR: HOW TO SAVE TRUCK RACING!

    It’s really not that difficult to organize a competitive race series. But turning down money? Now that’s tough,blogs Stephen Cox.

    NASCAR: HOW TO SAVE TRUCK RACING! The easy way to run a series is to have an official provider for everything from tires to body kits to engines. Mandatory components (spec parts) are frequently offered as a fix-all solution though in reality, costs are rarely contained. Remember, everyone at every step along the way has to make money. That means the series, parts manufacturers, distributors and on and on. Everyone gets a piece of the action and team owners are stuck with the ever-spiraling bills. The usual result is just what we see in the Indy Lights Series and Indycar – higher costs and lower car count.

    All of this is a result of wrong thinking. The job of a race series is not to put a limit on how much money teams can spend. The job of a race series is to make sure that spending money doesn’t help. NASCAR’s Camping World Truck Series is in trouble because competitive engine packages are too expensive. Teams are losing money and closing up shop. NASCAR’s response is to consider a spec engine. Wrong thinking.

    NASCAR: HOW TO SAVE TRUCK RACING!Take away their tires and everything else becomes elementary. NASCAR tires are enormously wide and offer a broad, sticky contact patch with the asphalt. The trucks reach tremendous speeds before they begin to lose adhesion and when they do, the drift is slight and nearly imperceptible to the average race fan. The racing isn’t that good. The tires are just too wide. If NASCAR trucks adopted a narrow, hard compound tire, the importance of horsepower would diminish considerably. Speeds would drop. The trucks would visibly slide on the racetrack and average race fans could see and appreciate the skill of the drivers.

    NASCAR: HOW TO SAVE TRUCK RACING! Teams who spend fantastic sums on engine power would find themselves gaining little, if any, real advantage because without big, wide tires, it would be impossible to utilize all that engine power. The limiting factor in a truck’s speed would no longer be the engine; it would be the tires. The series should concern itself with reducing mechanical grip and to a lesser extent, aerodynamic grip. When the trucks begin to slide, the real racing begins and the unbridled supremacy of overpriced engines quickly fades.

    The job of the series isn’t to limit horsepower or spending. NASCAR’s job is to limit the amount of horsepower that can be used in a race by eliminating traction. When that is achieved, the enormous horsepower and massive engine budgets will collapse of their own weight and teams will begin considering the Camping World Truck Series as a viable alternative again. That’s how to save truck racing.

    Stephen Cox is Sopwith Motorsports Television Productions Driver, Super Cup Series & EGT Championship, and Co-Host, Mecum Auctions on NBCSN. Sponsored by http://www.mcgunegillengines.com/and http://www.boschett-timepieces.com/index.php

    The post NASCAR: HOW TO SAVE TRUCK RACING! appeared first on Car Guy Chronicles.

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  • ’59 STINGRAY: TRIBUTE TO A MASTERPIECE!

    It’s “the Sting of Inspiration’ blogs CarGuyChronicles’ Jim Palam, who succumbed to the magnetic appeal of the Fiberfab Centurion.

    Bill Mitchell’s real XP-87 Stingray, top, photographed with two other Corvette legends – SR-2 and the iconic Grand Sport coupe – by Marty Schorr at the GM Proving Ground. Jim Palam’s photo of the Fiberfab Centurion, above.

    In 1959 GM design chief Bill Mitchell wasn’t buying into the ban on manufacturer-sponsored racing proposed by the Automobile Manufacturers Association. He assembled a team of designers, headed up by Tony Lapine and working with Larry Shinoda, Chuck Pohlman and Gene Garfinkle, working on the XP-87 project in his secret “Hammer Room” studio. Peter Brock had worked on the XP-87 design prior to the team being assembled and he moved on to another Corvette Concept.

    The XP-87 competition roadster is the forefather of the legendary C-2 Sting Ray Corvette. After Mitchell chose to retire his beautiful, race-tested Concept, many felt the ’63 Sting Ray wasn’t quite filling the XP-87 void.

    So Fiberfab’s Warren “Bud” Goodwin’s decided to seize the opportunity to resurrect the XP-87 concept by building the Fiberfab Centurion in 1965. 

The example I discovered at Rick Cole Auctions in Monterey is 1 of only 8-12 Centurions produced between 1965 and 1966. With obvious design inspiration from Mitchell’s XP-87, this Inca-Silver Centurion sits on a ’58 Corvette chassis and features dual head-rest fairings, a Rochester FI 283 motor, 4-speed transmission and a 4.11 Posi rear. The Centurion body was designed and engineered to fit on any C-1 Corvette chassis

    While there was plenty of buzz about this car during Car Week 2016, a high bid of $175,000 wasn’t quite enough to reel-in this radical roadster. Ultimately, GM halted production of this kit car, claiming ’58 Stingray Racer patent infringement.

     

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  • ELECTRIC PACESETTER: JAGUAR UNLEASHES LATEST CAT!

    Jaguar gives us a sneak-peak into its future. And it’s electric, blogs Road Test Editor Howard Walker.

    The undisputed star of this week’s Los Angeles auto show is an all-new, all-electric performance crossover from Jaguar, called I-Pace.

    While its official title is I-Pace Concept, this sleek, head-turning five-seater is essentially the same car that will hit the streets in a couple of years, priced – and we’re guessing here – from around $60,000.

    Despite the badge and its five seats, this new I-Pace shares zip, zero, nada with Jaguar’s recently launched F-Pace SUV. The entire car has been developed from a clean sheet of paper, using some very cool battery technology and featuring dramatic, so-called “cab-forward” styling.

    What Jaguar’s electrification gurus have done is develop in-house a battery pack featuring 36 liquid-cooled lithium-ion cells. These provide the juice to amp-up two 200-horsepower electric motors – one for each axle – making the I-Pace an all-wheel driver.

    With a total output of 400 horsepower and 516 pound-feet of torque – pretty much the same torque as Jag’s insanely-rapid F-Type SVR sports car – the I-Pace should be super-quick. How quick? Jaguar talks of 0-to-60 mph sprinting in just 4.0 seconds. That’s fast.

    How far will it go on a single charge? Jaguar talks about a range of around 220 miles, though plug it into a public 50kW DC charging outlet and you’ll get a 80 percent charge in 90 minutes and a full 100 percent charge in just over two hours.

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  • Maverick Viñales claims career best finish in Austin

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    Maverick Viñales claimed a career best fourth position at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas, insisting the podium will come soon.

    The 21-year-old is widely expected to leave Suzuki at the end of this season to replace the outgoing Jorge Lorenzo and his performance in the Americas Grand Prix showed exactly why Yamaha are so hot on him.

    Battling through the field after a disappointing start from the second row, Viñales eventually found himself battling with his Ecstar Suzuki team-mate Aleix Espargaro. Viñales managed to utalise his superior pace to get ahead of his team-mate, although the gap up to third place Andrea Iannone was already too big to close.

    Despite having issues with the grip at the rear of his Suzuki GSX-RR, Viñales was frustrated to not convert his pace through the weekend into the podium, but after seeing the gap to the Ducati, the Spaniard decided to settle for a career best finish.

    “Unfortunately we had some troubles with the grip at the rear tyre, I felt confident until almost half of the race, already thinking to be able to recover on the third place, but then the performance dropped dramatically and made the recovery impossible,” explained Viñales after the chequered flag.

    “At the end I decided to take the fourth and get to the finish. The result is positive, being fourth is my best result since I’ve been in MotoGP, but after the positive weekend it is a pity that we couldn’t finalise an even better result.”

     

     

  • Important podium for Iannone at CoTA

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    Andrea Iannone claimed his first podium of 2016 at the Circuit of the Americas last weekend, and it couldn’t have come at a better time on the back of four consecutive DNF’s. 

    After the drama of Argentina seven days earlier, Iannone would’ve been hoping for a quiet race in Texas and that’s exactly what he got, finishing five seconds behind second place Jorge Lorenzo and seven seconds ahead of Suzuki’s Maverick Viñales. 

    Iannone started the Grand Prix of the Americas from seventh place, serving his three position penalty for causing the crash in Termas de Rio last week, however this week he was the beneficiary of more misfortune to his team-mate. This time it was Dani Pedrosa, ironically the man who was promoted into third position after Iannone’s suicide move last week, who smashing into the side of Dovizioso this week, promoting Iannone to third place. 

    With Jorge Lorenzo expected to officially announce his move to Ducati next time out in Jerez, Iannone knew it was important to finally get some points on the board in Austin. 

    “It was really important for me to finish on the podium today, but more than anything else to finish this race with a good result,” said Iannone. I was sorry I was demoted one row on the grid and in addition, at the start, I made contact with Dani and Aleix and lost a few places.”

    Iannone was happy with the race pace of his Desmosedici, suggesting he believes he could’ve challenged Lorenzo for second place had he not started from the third row of the grid. 

    “In the race however I was very constant and always lapped with a good pace, very close to Jorge’s, and if I had started well, maybe I could even have fought it out for second place,” he said.

    “In any case I am pleased with the way the GP went and I’d like to dedicate this podium to Ducati and to all the team because I made them suffer in the first two races and I hope that this result repays them for the commitment and the work that they are doing for me.”

     

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