• Rent a Supercar

    Have you ever dreamed of driving a Lamborghini or Ferrari? Well now you can, and not just for a few laps around a track. With specialist supercar hire firms you can rent out a supercar for an entire day, weekend or week.

    A short 10 minutes of form filling and payment of the applicable fee and you are free to drive away your supercar of choice.  You can even have your chosen car delivered to your door, anywhere in the UK, such as your place of work, home or airport.

    Here are 3 exciting Hybrid supercars of the moment which you can rent short or long term.

    BMW i8 Hybrid

    With a price range starting from £750.00 per day, experience the first supercar with the consumption and emission values of a small family car. The i8 brings comfort, style, economy and power all in one. Apart from drawing stares, the i8 means business on the race track.

    BMW i8

    BMW i8

    Porsche 918 Spyder Hybrid

    The Porsche 918 Spyder is an awe-inspiring mid-engined plug-in hybrid supercar completely in a class of its own due to Porsches racing and economy pedigree. Did you know that the 918 Spyder is the second plug-in hybrid from Porsche after the Panamera S E-Hybrid? Get behind the wheel for £2200.00 per day

    porsche 918 spyder hybrid

    Porsche 918 spyder hybrid

    McLaren P1 Hybrid

    The McLaren P1 is a plug-in hybrid supercar built in limited numbers. McLaren’s F1 background has made a dramatic impact on the evolution of Hybrid Supercars. Being the successor to the F1, it utilizes hybrid power and Formula 1 technology to the extreme. All yours to enjoy for £2200.00 per day.

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  • Bugatti Veyron 16.4 vs Rimac Concept_One

    Watch petrolhead peer Lord Pembroke’s Bugatti Veyron and Mate Rimac’s Concept_One go head-to-head on track.

    Lord Pembroke can’t resist a challenge, so when the chance came to pitch his pride and joy against the latest technological tour de force from Croatia – the Rimac Concept_One electric supercar – he didn’t have to think twice.

    The founder of the Wilton Classic & Supercar show – which relaunches this year as the UK’s most prestigious and exclusive annual supercar and classics gathering – swapped cars with Rimac’s official test driver, Miroslav Zrncevic.

    “Looking forward to the technologies driving future performance will be one of the most fascinating elements of the new Wilton Classic & Supercar event,” says Lord Pembroke, “and we wanted to get to know our new friends at Rimac – builders of the world’s fastest accelerating supercar – as part of that journey of discovery.

    “It’s fair to say the Wilton team returned from Croatia having been blown away by the technology built into the Concept_One, and awed by the single-minded dedication of the man behind it. Now we can’t wait to share some of that Rimac magic at our new event on June 3-4.”

     

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  • INDYCAR: SO YOU WANT TO DRIVE THE INDY 500?

    We’ve suspected this for many years and now it’s official. The Indianapolis 500 is no longer a reasonable aspiration for most racing drivers, blogs Stephen Cox.

    Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS) president Doug Boles was kind enough to talk with me briefly at the annual PRI trade show in Indy. I asked him what his plan was to increase the number of entries at the Indianapolis 500. His answer took me by surprise.

    “We grew up falling in love with the sport when you had that number of entries,” Boles said. “A lot of those entries were guys who sat around in December and said, ‘You know what? We’re going to build a car in our garage and we’re going to enter it at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for the Indy 500.’”

    “But first and foremost in my mind is just really safety. I don’t think it makes sense for us to get back to fifty or sixty cars just from a safety standpoint,” Boles continued. “I’d love to see fifty or sixty or seventy cars entering and guys just being able to decide that they have a driver who’s running at Putnamville and we’re going to give him a shot to run at the Speedway. I just don’t think it’s practical anymore.”

    Let that statement sink in. American short track drivers – who routinely filled the field until the 1980s – are now considered unsafe and incapable of running the Indy 500.

    Don’t ever go back to the speedway and expect to find the next A. J. Foyt or Parnelli Jones. There won’t be one. Nor will you ever see another Stan Fox or Rich Vogler claw their way up through the ranks and make it to Indy. For that matter, we’re also unlikely to ever see another Rick Mears or Robby Gordon. Those guys got to Indy through off-road desert racing, not Indycar’s current ladder system. They would likely be considered unsafe at the speedway today.

    Boles countered by saying, “We have the best on-track product that we’ve ever had in the history of the speedway with the last five years. The number of lead changes we have, the number of cars in the field that have a chance of winning it.”

    True, recent events have had a certain NASCAR-green-white-checkered-overtime excitement to them. However, this was not achieved by eliminating drivers of sprint cars, off-road trucks, midgets, late-models or amateur sports cars from the speedway. It was achieved – if indeed, this can be called an “achievement” at all – through regulation.

    More teams are in contention because everyone is forced to use the same spec car. The additional lead changes were artificially created through “push to pass” legislation and turbo boost mandates. Using this logic, even better races could be manufactured by enacting a rule disqualifying anyone who leads two consecutive laps, thus assuring 249 lead changes in every 500!

    The bottom line is this – SCCA drivers are welcome to compete at IMS in the Run Offs. SVRA drivers are welcome to Indy’s vintage event. Short track drivers are welcome to buy tickets and sit in Turn Three.

    But the speedway has no intention of enlarging the field past forty cars and creating space that could be filled by new drivers from other disciplines. That is bad news for thousands of very good racing drivers worldwide. And it is even worse news for the Indianapolis 500 itself, whose relevancy continues to fade.

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  • Renaultsport Mégane 275 Trophy – First Impressions

    You could be forgiven for thinking that the current Renault Mégane was getting a little long in the tooth. Its current guise has been on sale since 2009 and in that time we’ve seen all-new sporting models from Ford, SEAT, Volkswagen and Audi. So to step into the Renaultsport Mégane 275 Trophy and still be amazed at how well it drives is testament to the astonishing abilities of Dieppe’s finest engineers.

    Renault Megane 275 Trophy 01

    Renault Megane 275 Trophy (image courtesy of Newspress)

     

    Close inspection of this Mégane’s tyres reveals that they are the optional semi-slick Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2s. Pick these and you’re treated to a set of rubber that looks barely road-legal but offers amazing grip. The only problem, apart from the £1,000 price tag, is you need to work hard to generate enough heat to extract their full potential. They may be great on dry, smooth tarmac but on a cold, wet Spring morning they could be terrifying – it’s an option aimed squarely at the track rather than the UK’s inclement weather and greasy roads.

    Hidden behind the 19-inch Turini wheels and Brembo braking system lies a set of £2,000 Ohlins dampers that are lifted from the Mégane N4 rally car. That’s a lot to spend on a damper upgrade but they tip the usual road-car compromise back from cost firmly in favour of ability.

    Some special cars feel right within just a few hundred yards and the Mégane Trophy is one of them. The steering is perfectly weighted and talks back to you, unlike in most modern hatchbacks. It’s incredibly direct too and it allows you to point the Mégane exactly where you want it to go.

    Renault Megane 275 Trophy 02

    Renault Megane 275 Trophy (image courtesy of Newspress)

    The grip from those Cup 2 tyres is impressive. While Millbrook’s ever-vigilant marshals put paid to any serious efforts to test cornering Gs, the Michelin’s ability to cope with 275bhp and 360Nm were impressive. As well as the abundant grip there’s a limited-slip differential shuffling torque between the front wheels, and the result is ballistic acceleration from far earlier in the corner than would otherwise seem sensible.

    The Ohlins dampers are superb. Body movement is tightly controlled but there’s a supple side to the Mégane’s ride that’s absent in the standard 275, which usually comes across as ridiculously brittle on anything but the smoothest tarmac. That’s the benefit of upgrading to the more expensive dampers.

    Renault Megane 275 Trophy Wheels

    Renault Megane 275 Trophy Turini wheels wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres and covering Brembo brakes

    The last Renaultsport product to feature dampers like this was the Clio 182 Trophy. It used a set of Sachs Race Engineering items that cost 10 times as much as a standard Clio’s dampers but they transformed the Trophy’s handling. It’s now regarded as a collector’s item. Is it worth upgrading your Mégane? Absolutely.

    The rest of the car remains as you’d expect. A bit of carbon effect trim, red highlights, some alcantara trim and firm but well-bolstered Recaro seats. The fussy media system remains, sacrificing touch controls for fiddly buttons down near the handbrake. The Start/Stop button also hints at cost cutting, sitting low and far to the left, a consequence of positioning it for left-hand drivers and not retooling the dash layout for right-handers.

    Renault Megane 275 Trophy 03

    Stickers make it easy to identify the Megane 275 Trophy

    Not that it matters. Renaultsport models have always been about the driving experience and that’s where the Mégane still excels. If you can come to terms with the £32k price of a Trophy-spec Mégane there’s little else that can beat its fluid responses and beguiling chassis. It might be outgunned by several rivals and it might not be cheap either, but the joy of driving is still at the heart of the Mégane’s appeal.

    Performance & Economy 2015 Mégane Renaultsport 275 Trophy
    Engine 1,998cc turbocharged 4-cylinder, petrol
    Transmission 6-speed manual, front-wheel drive
    Power (PS / bhp) 279 / 275
    Torque (Nm / lb.ft) 360 / 265
    0 – 60 mph (seconds) 6.0
    Top Speed (mph) 158
    CO2 Emissions (g/km) 174
    VED Band H
    Combined Economy (mpg) 37
    Kerb Weight (kg) 1,376
    Price (OTR) £28,930

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  • Buffalo Children’s Motorcycle Kit

    The choice of what level of protection you need from motorcycle clothing generally comes down to personal preference for adults. If you’ve reached a reasonable age, ridden for a while, and want to ride in T-shirt, shorts and trainers, ultimately that’s down to you. But it certainly doesn’t apply to children, especially when options like the Buffalo children’s motorcycle kit make it relatively inexpensive to kit them out.

    Not only does it cost under £130 to sort a child with a jacket, trousers and gloves, but they’re also designed with adjustable sleeves and legs to help them accommodate a bit of growth. And even when you add the cost of a suitable helmet, you’re still looking at less than the cost of the latest games console.

    The Buffalo Ranger Children’s Jacket is a versatile waterproof textile number with front and rear vents, plus a removable thermal liner. There’s CE-approved armour at the shoulders and elbows. And the fit can be tailored to each child with adjustable Velcro straps at the cuffs, upper and lower arms and waist.

    Buffalo Ranger Childrens Motorcycle Jacket Black

    There are also expansion zips on the sleeves to make them longer as your child grows. So you should get a decent amount of use from the Buffalo Ranger before you need to get a larger size. The jacket also has reflective details, and both internal and external pockets to stuff with sweets, pebbles and everything else the typical child accumulates.

    Buffalo Ranger Childrens Motorcycle Jacket Black Neon

    The Buffalo Ranger is available in sizes XS (6-7 years) to XL (13-14 years), and comes in either Black or Black/Neon Yellow. It costs £59.99.

    Also available are the matching Buffalo Imola Textile Trousers, in the same XS-XL sizes. They feature the same waterproof textile, and include Thermomix insulation and a removable quilted lining. The knees get CE-approved armour, and again, you can use the expansion zip system to fit longer legs as time goes by. The Buffalo Imola in kid’s sizes cost £46.99.

    Buffalo Imola Childrens Motorcycle Trousers Black

    Finally there are the Buffalo Tracker Gloves which come in Junior sizes S-L in Black, Red or Blue. They’re made from suede leather and textile with a twin overlay on the knuckles and palm. Waterproof, windproof and breathable, they also have a thermal lining and a Velcro-retained wrist strap to keep them on. Plus a pull cord to stop rain getting in the top and leading to a pair of small, cold hands and complaints. The Buffalo Tracker Gloves cost £18.99.

    Buffalo Tracker Childrens Motorcycle Gloves

    Other options are available, but the Buffalo children’s motorcycle kit shows that it doesn’t have to be expensive to kit out a youngster. And that’s important when a 7 or 8-year-old has little concept of danger, gravel rash or how to question their safety if a parent is taking them out for a pillion ride.

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