• WILD-EYED & REVVED-UP: RODS AND ROSES!

    It’s become a tradition: The High Noon Engine Rev at the Rods & Roses Car Show in Carpinteria, CA. The show celebrated its 20 Anniversary on July 1st – and the roar of the engines this year was a loud salute to local automotive legend, Andy Granetelli.

    There were over 150 wicked, wonderful and wild-eyed customs, classics and musclecars lining Linden Avenue, Carpinteria’s main thoroughfare that delivers you to the “World’s Safest Beach” on the Pacific. Proceeds from this always-enjoyable show support local non-profits such as Future Farmers of America and Carpinteria Education Foundation. Our Jim Palam captured the spunk and spirit of this July 4th weekend event.The only thing thorny about Leonard Login’s ’23 Ford “C” Cab Custom, above, is the complimentary Participant Rose catching a stare from wild eyes on the air scoop covers.

    If you had a Fury fixation in 1958 then you needed to drop $3,892 to grab the title to this full-option Plymouth Fury. This one features an optional 350/305 dual-quad engine and push-button automatic. Bill Craffey proudly owns this high-fin beauty, left.

    It’s official: Chicks dig Porsches! Bill Pitruzzelli’s ‘56 Porsche Carrera GT attracts a bevy of young show goers.

    If there’s a car show anywhere near Michael Hammer’s home base in Montecito, you can bet that he’ll be there with a big grin and some eye-poppin’ treats from his impressive car collection – like this super-slammed and sexy ’51 Chevy Lead Sled.

    One of the High-Noon noisemakers was this Chip Foose designed, Jordan Quintal built F-100 Custom from the Petersen Museum Collection. That’s a towering cast-iron 502-cube V8 sporting a blower with “F-this” badging!

    Purple People Pleaser!. Rob Hansen’s plum-perfect ‘70 Dodge Challenger R/T sits ready to pounce at the intersection of Sleek and Sexy.

    Seeing Double: The folks at Mathon Engineering in New Jersey like doubling-up on their project bets. ’23 Ford T-Bucket – another Petersen Museum car – has at its thumpin’ heart a double-Chevy 350-inch motor mash-up.

    Ron Lawrence is a retired LA County firefighter who apparently got tired of polishing things. So it’s no surprise that this car guy’s pride and joy is this perfectly weathered and unpolished ‘30 Model A Ford roadster.

    How to Drive to Work: This beautiful and original (one respray since new) ‘68 Shelby GT350 is a daily driver for a Santa Barbara technology executive. What, no Tesla?

    Heading out of the show I spotted this ‘Work in Progress’ Low Rider parked on a side street. POTUS might call this frugal custom a “Bad Hombre.” But come on, those frenched antennas are a sure sign of style and sophistication. Pass the Grey Poupon, s’il vous plait!

    Words & photos: Jim Palam, http://www.jimpalam.com/

    For more information about Rods And Roses, please visit https://rodsandroses.wordpress.com/

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  • Jeep gets dirty with Renegade ‘Tough Mudder’ Edition

    Jeep is celebrating its fourth year sponsoring the UK Tough Mudder series with a special edition Renegade 4×4.

    Just 100 Jeep Renegade Tough Mudder 4x4s will be made, and to mark the occasion, the first ever ‘Tough Mudder for Jeep’ took place at Silverstone Circuit’s off-road course in Northamptonshire.

    The Renegade successfully waded through a course designed by Tough Mudder, tackling rough terrain, dirty water and signature Tough Mudder obstacles, including ‘Mud Mile’ and ‘Quagmire.’ The SUV also tackled the steep slopes and inclines of ‘Killa Gorilla’ and the treacherous Cliff Hanger obstacle.

    Priced from £27,795, Jeep reckons the limited edition “embodies the spirit, fun, adventure and innovation of Tough Mudder with Jeep’s legendary off-road credentials, ensuring drivers can tackle any challenge while Mudders push themselves into the unknown”.

    The Tough Mudder Renegade is a 4×4 2.0-litre Multijet diesel automatic, available in orange and black. Standard features include:

    • 2.0 Diesel Multijet II (140hp)
    • 9 speed automatic transmission
    • 4×4 Active Low
    • 17” black alloy off road wheels – with 215/60/ R17 Mud & Snow tyres
    • Tough Mudder exclusive bonnet decal
    • Limited edition numbered stickers on upper rear three quarter panel
    • Tough Mudder tailgate badge
    • Off road style front bumper
    • Specific interior look – orange and black – with anodised orange interior bezels
    • Fabric – heated front seats
    • (DAB) Digital radio
    • Uconnect 5” touchscreen with Bluetooth, Sat Nav and live services
    • All weather floor mats
    • Tough Mudder Merchandise Pack to include water bottle, cap, hand towel, lanyard and wrist band in a drawstring bag

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  • New Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket Comes With Over-Trousers

    Ever had to peel off soggy jeans after a rainstorm? It was dry and sunny when you left. But then the rain came and now you’re wearing soaked denim leggings. And your legs have turned blue from a combination of the cold and colours running. Well, the new Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket comes with over-trousers in a large rear pocket to prevent that happening again.

    2017 Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket comes with overtrousers built in
    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket carries lightweight over-trousers in a large rear pocket

    The over-trousers aren’t going to get you through a track day. But they will keep you snug and dry if you get caught out by a shower. So while Weise may call it a touring jacket, we’d say it’s as good for short trips and commuting, without having to carry a backpack full of spare kit. Especially when armoured jeans have become more and more popular.

    The W-Tex trousers have a full polyester lining, with an elasticated waist and Velcro ankle pull tabs. So they’re easy to wear and should be comfortable.

    The Weise W-Tex waterproof jeans come with the Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket

    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket itself is your standard all-weather motorcycle jacket. It has a waterproof and breathable drop liner, plus a full-length popper and Velcro storm flap over a YKK zip to keep your top half dry.

    Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket
    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket in Black/Stone

    There’s a removable 120-gram thermal quilted liner to cope with changing temperatures. And large two-way zipped vents at the cuffs, shoulders and on the back to let cool air in when you need it.

    The shell of the Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket is made from tough 600 denier material. And there’s removable Knox Micro-Lock CE-approved armour at the shoulders, elbows and back.

    2017 Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket with Over-Trousers Black
    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket in Black

    To help you be seen, there is reflective detailing on the arms and back. And you can adjust the collar, waist and torso to get the right fit. The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket has the large rear pocket for storing your handy over-trousers, and also has four large external pockets and two smaller hand warmer pockets.

    2017 Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket with Over-Trousers Back

    The Weise W-Tex Touring Jacket with the W-Tex waterproof jeans included will cost £289.99 and comes in Black (sizes M-5XL) and Black/Stone (sizes M-3XL).

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  • New Weise Outlast Houston Motorcycle Jacket

    If you’re looking for an armoured, waterproof, textile motorcycle jacket, it’s worth checking out the new Weise Outlast Houston, which is new for 2017.

    Outlast material was originally developed for NASA to assist astronauts. It does this by absorbing, storing and releasing heat when needed. Essentially it’s a load of capsules inside your clothing which change from solid to liquid and back again depending on the temperature. So while you won’t expect to encounter the sub-zero conditions of space, or the sudden sensation of being in direct sunlight in a vacuum, it should help in changeable conditions on your commute to work.

    The Weise Outlast Houston textile motorcycle jacket
    The Weise Outlast Houston textile motorcycle jacket

    In addition to the Outlast lining, you also get vents on the arms, chest and back for those times when the weather gets warmer.

    The Weise Outlast Houston also has a tough, tear-resistant rip-stop outer with a waterproof and breathable lining. And to stop the rain getting in is a YKK central zip, plus a popper and Velcro storm flap.

    Weise Outlast Houston Back Weise Outlast Houston Front

    You get CE-approved armour at the shoulders, elbows and back. Plus there are a number of pockets both inside and outside the jacket, including a large map pocket at the back.

    Weise Outlast Houston Modelled

    The Weise Outlast Houston motorcycle jacket is available in sizes Small-5XL in Black and Medium-3XL in Black/Stone, with a 2 year ‘no-quibble’ guarantee for £159.99.

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  • SVRA HEACOCK CLASSIC: THE GOLD STANDARD!

    Mike Matune goes trackside at VIR to bring us highlights of the Gold Cup historic races.

    The SVRA wrapped up part of its season at the Heacock Class “Gold Cup historic races at VIRginia International Raceway. Optimum weather and VIR’s lush surroundings welcomed a bevy of seasoned racers. Spectators were treated to the sights and sounds of some great big-bore historic racecars. Olthoff Racing (www.olthoffracing.com) of NC showed up with three Superformance GT40s, top, including those of Harry McPherson (#2) and Jeff McKee.

    Curt Vogt brought his ‘70 Mustang, above. While it is a genuine Boss 302, it has no race history and is prepared to the current vintage rulebook as opposed to period standards. The engine puts out close to 600 horsepower and Vogt used every one of them as he manhandled the beast around VIR, frequently testing the limits of the track’s “friction circle”.

    Michael Lange’s Ford GT was built by Matech in Switzerland for GT3 competition in Europe. It served as an interesting contrast to the 1960s era technology of the Superformance cars. The car has approximately 500 horsepower from a Ford DOHC V8 backed by a Hewland sequential gearbox. Extensive use of carbon fiber keeps overall weight to about 2,300 pounds, allowing “adequate” performance. A surprising feature of the car is air conditioning!

    Tommy Riggins originally built this Falcon for the updated Trans-Am series. It never turned a wheel there and ended up competing in SCCA GT1. It features a fiberglass silhouette body favoring the 1963 Falcon (if you squint) on a modern tubular frame with tubular A-arms up front and a Ford nine-inch rear end suspended with a three-link system. Power comes from a 358-inch Rousch-Yates Ford V-8. Doug Richmond bought the car and freshened it for the vintage racing wars. VIR was its second outing under his ownership.

    It is hard to fault the lines on the Lola T70, Eric Broadley’s early attempt at a Group 7 racecar. Tom Shelton’s example was originally sold by the late Carl Haas, Lola’s U.S. importer to a privateer. It was campaigned in the USRRC and Can-Am with very modest success. As an early Mark I model, it had a narrow body updated to its present wide-body to accommodate hefty racing rubber during its extensive restoration.

    Dave Robert’s ‘56 Corvette could was converted into a racecar by Chicago area Motor Sport Research in the early 1960s. It would live a life over time involving multiple owners and drivers, each attaining some level of success. When technology eventually caught up with it, it became a vintage racer and continued its winning ways. Roberts has recently returned the car to its original configuration to best celebrate its historic significance.

    Ken Mennella is a long time vintage competitor in his “tribute” ‘63 Corvette Grand Sport roadster. Equipped with a 600 horsepower, 400-inch Chevy small-block and TexRacing Super T-10 transmission, the car has been wining in SVRA Groups 5 & 10 for more than ten years. His car is a faithful reproduction of what was envisioned as an American car to beat Shelby’s Cobra and the fastest European racing cars. Its promise was short lived when GM enforced its anti-racing position.

    Externally Robert Gee’s ‘69 Corvette has all the pieces associated with the L88 endurance racing package – fender flares, fixed headlights under clear plastic covers and a vented and bubbled hood. It’s small-block powered and prepared to B/Production vintage standards with original brakes and stamped steel a-arms.

    Bob Lima’s big-block powered Corvette was formerly raced by Dick Kantrud. Like Gee’s car, it features styling cues from the famed Corvette endurance racers of the late-1960s,-early 1970s. Power comes from a big block Chevy with Edelbrock aluminum heads and a plethora of racing hardware. The raised headlights with clear covers reduced weight and complexity by eliminating the retracting mechanism. They also allowed improved airflow.

    Corvette racecars come in all forms from nearly showroom stock to purpose-built racers like Jeff Bernatovich’s entry. Originally built by Irv Hoerr, it combines a tube frame and look-alike fiberglass body panels, sharing precious little with its production counterparts. Some racers like this approach because instead of removing extraneous street components and beefing up cars that were never intended to withstand racetrack punishment, they are starting with a clean slate and incorporating only that what they need for speed and safety.

     

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