• The Rescogs Guide to Winter Biking

    Riding a motorcycle in Winter happens for a variety of reasons. For some of us, the lack of a car or car license makes it a necessity. Scottie went through almost 20 years relying solely on two-wheeled transport, come rain, wind, sleet and snow. For others, it’s still worthwhile to avoid the endless traffic jams and the joys of public transport. But it isn’t all doom and gloom when the days get shorter, especially if you do it right.

    Good Reasons to Ride in Winter:

    • A dry, sunny Winter day is awesome. A dry, sunny Christmas day is even better, as most car drivers (And law enforcement operatives) seem to either be in front of the TV or in the pub. Which means empty roads away from town centres.
    • You’ll still be sharp come Spring, rather than spending the first couple of weeks getting used to being back on a bike.
    • You’ll also build up a good feeling of smug superiority over fair weather riders, and endless tales of Winter riding to bore them with when you speak to them.
    • Winter Hacks: A chance to pick up something different and cheap, and then abuse it.
    • Winter kit: It gets better, and cheaper every year.
    • You might have to be a bit more careful, but you’ll still get there faster without having to worry about traffic jams.

    Continue Reading…

  • ST. MICHAELS CONCOURS: SHOWTIME ON CHESAPEAKE BAY!

    Mike Matune brings us highlights from one of the top East Coast Concours.

    As the show season winds down, we always look forward to the St. Michaels Concours d’Elegance for one last hurrah. To celebrate its tenth year on the Concours calendar, it returned to the campus of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. This location allowed the showcasing of stunning wooden boats and outstanding automobiles, delivering pure sensory overload. Making its debut at St. Michaels was the North Collection’s ‘33 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300. Under its flaming Italian Racing Red paint is body done in the style of Touring, build by Pettenella.

    Robert Tattersall freely admits the lovely lady, right, featured on the hood of his ‘48 Triumph TRA 2000 is the most frequently photographed element of his car! It’s something of a shame as the car has many other notable features. Among them a “dickey” or rumble seat with a pop-up windshield.

    Tattersall’s Triumph, below, showcases some of the details that make it an excellent addition to the show field: period blanket and picnic basket. One could almost see Yogi Bear running off with the basket!

     

    Karen & John Gerhard’s ‘66 Ferrari 275 GTB Berlinetta was made for, and feels most comfortable on, the open road. When introduced at the 1964 Paris Auto Show, it marked a move by Ferrari to produce a more user-friendly version of its front-engined, closed sports car. But that move didn’t come at any reduction in performance. A Colombo designed 3.3-liter 280 horsepower V12 powered a new 275 chassis with four-wheel independent suspension.

    Here is an early example of American Muscle, Peter Stiffel’s ‘11 Mercer Raceabout. It utilized a minimalist approach to lower weight and high performance. Nothing was included that didn’t serve the singular purpose of providing its driver with a thrilling adventure.

    Max Hoffman, the legendary auto importer of the 1950s, gave us several important marques and models, among them the BMW 507 roadster. Impeccably styled by noted industrial designer Albrecht Goertz, it features a V-8 of just over three liters backed by a four-speed transmission. They became the darlings of the rich and famous in their day. Thomas Pesikey owns this beautiful, Rudge wheel equipped example.

    Paul & Linda Gould’s ‘35 Bugatti Type 57 Grand Raid Roadster was one of those cars you had to observe from every angle to drink in just how striking it is. This one is one of only two that were completed with bodies built by the Swiss firm, Worblaufen. This rear angle gives you a good idea of how all the elements of design combine into one very cohesive shape.

    Alvis is one of those British manufacturers that has disappeared. But before they went, they produced some very well styled cars like James Sprague’s ‘64 TE21 Drophead Coupe with coachwork by Park Ward. Actor Tony Curtis originally owned Sprague’s car. He had it fitted with power steering and brakes, automatic transmission and air conditioning.

    In a car that bore his name, E. L. Cord combined cutting edge engineering with equally impressive styling. FWD drive and a monocoque chassis rested under a rakish body with hideaway headlights and a “coffin” nose. Thomas Haines’s ‘36 Cord 810 Convertible Phaeton takes it all a step further with an open car still allowing for all weather protection.

    Barbara and Al Mason are frequent Concours competitors with their brilliant orange ‘28 Auburn 8-115 Speedster. At St. Michaels they came away with a double victory, earning not only People’s Choice, but also taking Best in Show. An impressive “Double” to say the least!

    Here is proof of the old adage about “There’s nothing new under the sun”. Bill Alley’s Waverly four-passenger Brougham is an electric car built in 1911. Originating in the period when the automobile was beginning to replace horse drawn conveyances, its appointments are more in keeping with an aristocrat’s carriage than what we would expect in an automobile. The interior looks like the drawing room in a fine home.

    Continue Reading…

  • Bugatti Veyron 16.4 vs Rimac Concept_One

    Watch petrolhead peer Lord Pembroke’s Bugatti Veyron and Mate Rimac’s Concept_One go head-to-head on track.

    Lord Pembroke can’t resist a challenge, so when the chance came to pitch his pride and joy against the latest technological tour de force from Croatia – the Rimac Concept_One electric supercar – he didn’t have to think twice.

    The founder of the Wilton Classic & Supercar show – which relaunches this year as the UK’s most prestigious and exclusive annual supercar and classics gathering – swapped cars with Rimac’s official test driver, Miroslav Zrncevic.

    “Looking forward to the technologies driving future performance will be one of the most fascinating elements of the new Wilton Classic & Supercar event,” says Lord Pembroke, “and we wanted to get to know our new friends at Rimac – builders of the world’s fastest accelerating supercar – as part of that journey of discovery.

    “It’s fair to say the Wilton team returned from Croatia having been blown away by the technology built into the Concept_One, and awed by the single-minded dedication of the man behind it. Now we can’t wait to share some of that Rimac magic at our new event on June 3-4.”

     

    Continue Reading…

  • New Knox Nexos Sport Touring Motorcycle Gloves

    The new Knox Nexos Sport Touring motorcycle gloves look like a stylish way to protect yourself this year. They’ve got relatively subtle logos and details, so you’re not limited to wearing them on the latest sports bike or looking like a bit of a plank. But at the same time, they’ve got all the armour and specs that you might expect by now.

    Knox Nexos Sport Touring motorcycle gloves in Black and White

    The Knox Nexos are made from tough cowhide leather uppers, with softer, more flexible goatskin on the palms. You also get elasticated stretch panels at the finger joints. So there should be plenty of feel and flexibility. The fingers also have seamless, wrap-around ends, which means less pain from an annoying join digging into the end of your pinkies.

    To keep the gloves secure on your hands, you get the latest L6 Boa closure system and wrist support, which means they’re consistently fastened and micro-adjustable. So that means you can get them nice and comfy, but also shouldn’t have them come loose or undone if you’re unlucky enough to have an accident.

    Knox Nexos Sport Touring motorcycle gloves in Black

    On the top of the glove is a three-part kuckle guard built from memory foam and impact-absorbing honeycomb gel under a soft, deformable TPU kuckle shield. So you get protection without having hard plastic either making it hard to move your hands, or digging into them. And you also get the patented Knox Scaphoid Protection System to protect your wrist bones and prevent hyperextension when sliding – there are also sliders built into the top of the fingers.

    The Knox Nexos Sport Touring motorcycle gloves are available in either Black/White or solid Black. The plain colour in particular means you won’t stand out wearing them on any road bike, including a classic or a modern retro. The only real indicator that they’re a new glove is that closure system. And the problem of saying Knox Nexos quickly 20 times. The Nexos are available in sizes Small-XXL, and will cost you £129.99.

    Continue Reading…

  • First-Time Car Buyer Guide

    Resultat d'imatges de First-Time Car Buyer

    A Brief Guide for a First-Time Car Buyer

    For a first-time buyer, the prospect of buying a car can be daunting. With so much choice on the market and many finance options to choose from, it’s difficult to know where to start when buying your first car.

    We understand that a car can be a big expense, so here are three things you should consider before making your purchase.

    New or Used?

    The first thing you should think about is whether you want a new or used car. Used cars are often the more affordable choice for first-time buyers, but it depends what you’re looking for in a car. Consider what you’ll be using your new purchase for and whether cost or reliability is the most important factor for you.

    Don’t write off the option of a new car. Although you many think they aren’t financially valuable, if you do your research, you will be likely to find low-rate finance deals that could be within your budget.

    With a new car, you won’t have to experience roadside breakdowns or costly repair bills. Many also have improved safety features that can aid you with driving, such as electronic stability control, back-up cameras and sensors, park assist and lane departure warnings.

    How to Pay

    Many people choose to buy a used car so they can pay for it outright, which is perhaps the most cost-effective way to buy a car. However, if you can’t afford to do this then there are many finance options available, such as hire purchase or a car lease, which allow you to make fixed monthly payments on your car.

    Put some research into the finance options available and weigh up the pros and cons of each to decide which is best for your financial situation.

    Find the Best Deal

    Research has shown that different seasons can affect the price of a car. The best deals are often found at the end of the year, during the festive season. This period is in the middle of registration plate changes and it is also the best time to negotiate a good deal as car dealers will be trying to reach their quarterly sales targets.

    Don’t forget to look online when you’re searching for the best deals on your new car. Dealers such as Unbeatable Car have an extensive collection of new and used cars that can be viewed online and you can also check whether you are eligible for finance on their website.

    By following our three tips, you can take your first step on your journey to buying your first car. Whether you decide to buy a new or used car, you will be able to find a good deal if you take your time to put in the research and consider the season that you make your purchase.

    Continue Reading…

dd