Ginster Yellow Coupe Quattro Holy Grail Hits the Auction Block

Ginster Yellow B3 Audi Coupe Quattro Rare Collectors Car

Near-Flawless Ginster Yellow ACQ is one of only a handful in this rare color. With 64,000 original miles, this is a collector’s holy grail. 

When someone outside the Audi world hears the phrase “Audi Coupe Quattro,” they’re most likely to picture the iconic UR Quattro or Quattro S1 rally car. That’s because its successor, the B3 Coupe Quattro, wasn’t the most successful of sales stories in North America. This is especially true when it comes to the color Ginster Yellow, which we’re happy to admit isn’t for everyone. With only around 1,750 ACQs ever selling among its short run of only 1990 and 1991 model years in the US, it’s estimated only a couple dozen came in this color. To find one is a difficult task. So, if you’re a classic Audi collector, we advise you get out your wallet because this one is for sale.

This rare beauty is currently listed for sale on Cars and Bids. At the time of writing, it’s got about a week left and currently holds a bid of just $4,600. However, we don’t anticipate it’s going to stay that low. Given the rarity and its condition, it’s hard to say what it will sell for. We can assure you, though, we’ll be watching it closely.

Audi 20V Naturally Aspirated five-cylinder engine

Classic Audi Five-Cylinder Power

While the European market did get these cars with turbo engines, we did not. However, they still have some legendary Audi heritage planted under the hood. The 2.3-liter inline-five 20-valve shares the same architecture as the rally icon. Dual-overhead-camshaft construction and a sound that you won’t soon forget, even naturally aspirated. Originally, this engine had an output of 164 horsepower and 157 pound-feet of torque. Of course, power is sent to all four wheels via the five-speed manual transmission.

The Ginster Yellow paint job is far from subtle, which perfectly contrasts how much the underloved B3 Coupe Quattro flew under the radar. Its 15″ Speedline wheels complement this color quite nicely, though. One thing’s for sure; nobody is going to miss this thing driving down the road!

Interior of B3 Audi Coupe Quattro for sale Cars and Bids

A Rare Gem Frozen in Time

The true selling point of this beauty is its overall condition. It has only 64,200 original miles, which is reflected inside and out. Though it isn’t perfect, it’s in remarkable shape for being 32 years old.

Known flaws listed in the article include rock chips, peeling paint on the grille, peeling clear coat on the hatch, wheel scratches, and, of course, some minor electrical issues. The passenger power mirror, driver’s window regulator, and driver’s power seat do not currently function.

It does have plenty of recent service history, though, including control arms, ball joints, and tie rods. Furthermore, it got a new battery, new thermostat, new tires, new water pump, timing belt, and a host of seals replaced, too. Finally, the seller had a new ABS sensor installed, and the air conditioning system serviced within 600 miles.

So, while it may not be Concours perfect, it truly is an ideal car for a collector who isn’t afraid to drive their vehicles. Moreover, it’s ideal for a collector who wants to be noticed as they drive down the road.

Photos: Cars and Bids

VIDEO: Six Glorious Minutes of Classic Audi Quattro S1 Noises

Audi Quattro S1 Group B

Words are unnecessary when the Group B legend that is the Audi Quattro S1 turns up for some vintage rallying and hill-climbing fun.

It’s amazing how one small change made such a big impact upon the world. Such was the case with Audi and its then-new quattro all-wheel drive system in the Eighties. Back then, it was novel to send all the power to all corners in a family car, and especially in high-performance cars. Yet, Ingolstadt proved one didn’t need to buy a truck to get the benefits all-wheel drive offered.

And of course, what better way to prove the point than by entering rallying under the FIA’s insane Group B regs. The moment all four wheels carved the quattro name into the dirt, they also etched Audi’s name into history. Thanks to this compilation by Palbo64 Rally & Racing Videos, we get to see – and hear – this history play out on the vintage rallying and hill-climbing circuits, in the form of the Audi Quattro S1.

Audi Quattro S1 Group B

Not only do we see the classic yellow and white livery of the Quattro campaigned by the likes of Michele Moulton and Walter Rohl, but a few other classic paints, too. There’s one with the Audi Sport colors of black, gray and red, of course. Then, there’s the red and white of the Belga team Quattro, once campaigned by famed Belgian driver and co-pilot Marc Duez and Willy Lux.

Audi Quattro S1 Group B

No words are necessary to explain how awesome these machines are. The Audi Quattro S1 more than speaks for itself with every pop, crackle, roar, and chirp from its turbocharged inline-five. The sound of the Group B monster in all its forms gives the angular coupe the proper voice for all of its adventures on paved and unpaved roads. Not to mention exciting the gathered crowds in this day, just as it did at the peak of madness decades ago.

Audi Quattro S1 Group B

The best part of all this, though? The teams who care for and preserve these legends today. Without them, all anyone would have of the Audi Quattro S1 would be historic footage. Long may the legend live.

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.

Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro review

Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro review

If want to drive a big 4×4, but would rather keep on the right side of eco warriors, then the latest EV from Audi could be the car for you…

Not only does it possess premium badge appeal, but with zero tailpipe emissions, it couldn’t be kinder to the environment.

What’s more, because it’s so similar to Audi’s conventional 4x4s, inside and out, it makes the switch from fossil fuels to battery electric so much smoother.

Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro review

The e-tron SUV first hit UK roads in 2019. The more athletic Sportback version (a streamlined roof gives it a coupe-esque look) followed a year later.

Now, the new ‘S’ is the sportiest version yet and will allow you to impress even the most traditional of petrol heads.

It can sprint from standstill to 62mph in just 4.5 seconds (a full second quicker than the standard e-tron) and on to a top speed of 130mph.

Naturally, it’s all-wheel drive, but unlike most of its rivals, which make do with two electric motors, the e-tron S has three – one up front and two at the back.

Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro review

It’s not just blisteringly fast, the e-tron S boasts serious road presence. Chunky, yet sporty, its front end is dominated by Audi’s aggressive ‘Singleframe’ grille and flashy LED lights. Head back and the profile is sharply styled, the wheels are enormous, and the rear is suitably pert.

The interior is just what you expect from Audi – a classy blend of soft-touch surfaces, leather, brushed chrome and state-of-the-art technology.

The cabin is spacious with ample room for rear seat passengers and a useful 615 litres of boot space (1,665 litres with the back seats folded), plus 60 litres under the bonnet (ideal for storing cables).

Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro review

Naturally, the driving position offers a commanding view of the road, while the level of refinement on the road is superb – partly down to the electric motor, but also its slippery shape and high build quality.

Tech highlights include Audi’s slick infotainment system utilising twin touchscreens, the lower of which displays the climate controls, but doubles as a writing pad for writing in a sat nav destination, for instance.

There’s also a digital driver’s display, plus stacks of safety and driver assistance equipment – and seven drive modes: Efficiency, Comfort, Auto, Dynamic, Individual, Off Road and All Road.

Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro review

You can also select Drive and Sport next to the gear selector. Drive is your day-to-day setting, while Sport unleashes all the car’s performance, increasing power for up to eight seconds.

Put your foot down and there’s that instant torque that all EVs deliver, yet it’s even more impressive in the mighty 2.6-tonne e-tron S.

Its agility seems to defy the laws of physics, delivering a composed and planted experience regardless of whether you’re cruising on a motorway or enjoying challenging country roads. It’s also more than capable of tackling off-road terrain.

Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro review

Of course, its proportions can make it a handful in town, but with great visibility, cameras and all-round sensors, you soon adjust.

However, no car is perfect and the e-tron S is no exception. On paper it has a range of up to 224 miles, but in the real world you’re looking at closer to 200 miles.

Unless you need a car to regularly cover that kind of mileage or you can’t fit a home charger, that might be a deal-breaker.

For the record, it will charge overnight from home and can take as little as 30 minutes to charge from 5% to 80% using a 150kW public charger (if you can find one).

Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro review

Finally, let’s not forget the price of the e-Tron S. The basic e-tron will set you back at least £62,560. The e-tron S Sportback starts at £88,760, and if it’s loaded with extras, can end up closer to £100,000.

Rivals include everything from the Jaguar I-Pace to the Tesla Model X and Mercedes-Benz EQC.

Verdict: The Audi e-tron S Sportback quattro is a class act – an enticing, zero emissions blend of performance, luxury and driving pleasure. Spacious and with genuine off-road ability, it’s a dream SUV for many.

This Audi Sport Quattro S1 Replica is Breath-Takingly Faithful to the Original

This Audi Sport Quattro S1 Replica Breath-Takingly Faithful to the Original

Auditography’s recent video is a thrilling ride where we see a faithful Audi Sport Quattro S1 E2 spitting fire as it dominates the streets of Markdorf, Germany.

In a recent Auditography video, the YouTube channel pays tribute to the legend that is Audi Sport Quattro S1 E2. This automotive icon was reigning supreme across rally stages around the world back in the 80s. The car in the video is a period-accurate replica, which is currently under the ownership of one Mr. Markus. The video itself offers a cinematic and detailed look at the Audi Sport Quattro S1 E2 replica.

before we discuss the replica, let’s take a quick look at the rich lineage of the Quattro S1 E2. The German automaker first introduced the fire-spitting rally racer towards the end of 1985. The car was a successor to the Quattro S1 variant, which was developed to meet the homologation requirements of Group B rallies. The S1 is also the first four-wheel-drive car to participate in the Group B Competition and set a record time at Pikes Peak with Michele Muoton behind the wheel.

This Audi Sport Quattro S1 Replica Breath-Takingly Faithful to the Original

With its 620 HP engine, this S1 E2 replica has more power than the original Pikes Peak racer.

The Group B rallies were canceled in 1986 because the competition was considered to be too dangerous. As a result of this, the S1 E2 was the final Group B rally car that Audi ever produced. Safe to say this replica has got some big shoes to fill. The video was shot in Markdorf, Germany, and according to Auditography, the motor of the car produces more power than the original race-spec engine.

In their factory tune, the most capable Quattro S1 E2s were churning out 600 HP and 435 lB-ft of torque. Under the hood of this replica is a 5-cylinder turbocharged engine, which allegedly produces 620 HP of maximum power. The entire ensemble only weighs around 2,535 lbs. According to the YouTube channel, this S1 E2 replica can also accelerate to 62 mph from a complete standstill in just 3 seconds.

The front-end of this S1 E2 replica is dominated by a set of six Hella lights and the car sports HP design livery. At the rear, we find a large wing, which further enhances the handling characteristics of this all-wheel-drive legend. The interior has been stripped down to keep the overall weight as low as possible.

Image Source: Auditography

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Past Legends Look Toward Future of Audi Quattro

Audi RS e-tron GT

With rally legends Stig Blomqvist and Fabrizia Pons, Audi DTM driver Nico Muller explores quattro’s past and future.

In 1980, Audi made a life-changing move for itself by introducing the quattro system to the world. No longer would all-wheel drive be the domain of trucks and agriculture. Now, passenger cars could use all corners to provide greater control on the road. Combined with high-performance, turbocharged engines, the new quattro carved a path for all cars to consider taking going forward.

In 2021, Audi’s quattro is now part of the electrification revolution in the overall auto industry. As a tribute, Audi’s YouTube channel enlisted their DTM driver, Nico Muller, to go back to where it all began: France’s Col de Turini. Of course, he wouldn’t be alone on this journey.

Audi Quattro

“Beginning of the Eighties, first ’82, you couldn’t believe the difference with two-wheel drive and four-wheel drive,” said rally legend Stig Blomqvist. “It was really nice, and the feeling was fantastic. I think Audi has done a good job before they started rallying because they wanted to show the rest of the world what four-wheel drive can do. Everybody was thinking, ‘Okay, it’s another Jeep system.’ But they soon find out it was a lot better than that.”

Blomqvist is one of a few to wield the might of the quattro in the Group B era. Through the ur-Quattro, Audi would not only rack up wins and records, but upend rallying forever with all four of its wheels. And what happens on race day translates to the showroom.

Audi RS e-tron GT

“In a combustion engine car, you have a single motor” said Audi Formula-E champion Lucas di Grassi. “You need a very complicated and sophisticated mechanical distribution with differentials and drive shafts to get this power and torque distributed in the four wheels.”

With the RS e-tron GT, computers and electric motors handle the job. Thus, performance is maximized. Blomqvist says the electric Audi outperforms his Group B terror. That’s certainly saying something.

Audi Quattro

“We had such a huge passion,” said rally legend Fabrizia Pons. “It didn’t matter at all how many nights we were not sleeping, and we were working, working, working. It’s important, the commitment. It’s important to know the car.”

Pons says her role as half of the first all-women rally duo with Michele Moulton didn’t hit her at first. Only years later did it occur to her how momentous and historic it was. She adds she’s always working toward the future, then and now, an attitude Audi knows well, especially with quattro.

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.