Audi 200 Delivers Terrifying Ride to the Streets of Fremont

1991 Audi 200

Unassuming 1991 Audi 200 features four tune maps, third of which sends the sedan flying with 640 ponies through stock transmission.

The third-gen Audi 100/200/5000 arrived with smoother, more aerodynamic styling to the three-box design, accented by pin-mounted windows. The result? A drag co-efficient of 0.30 on the base model alone. Thus, the Audi could slip past the gas stations for a while longer. And, once the 2.2-liter, 20-valve turbo-five arrived at the end of the Eighties, it could also slip by the competition.

This Audi 200 in Fremont, California, though, doesn’t just slip by. It straight-up kills them with four tune maps, the third of which is more than enough for the occupants, including Adam Swords of Adam Swords Rough Cuts.

1991 Audi 200

“We’re just about go dyno my Mk 7 Golf,” said Swords, “which is going to Stage 2. And while we’re waiting, [Nick Mercadante is] like, ‘Let me see if I can find something for us to play with. So, he pulls out this.”

As 034Motorsport’s marketing director says, the Audi 200 features a 2.2-liter turbo-five which the owner may have bored out to an unknown displacement. Mercandante says it also sends at least under 640 wheel horsepower on “the higher file maps” to (thankfully) all four corners. But that’s not even its final form.

1991 Audi 200

“So, that’s Map 1,” said Mercandante. “That’s lowest of boost, right around 28 pounds, I think. [The owner] has it wired through this switch right here. When I turn around, I’ll flip her up two maps above to Map 3.”

He says the Audi has four total maps, the third of which contains the aforementioned 640 ponies in the corral. However, the fourth map is where every bit of sanity is decimated in a blaze of turbocharged glory. Though un-dyno’d at the moment, he believes the 35 pounds of boost can take the sedan into the 700-horsepower range. And all on the stock manual transmission and shifter, too. As Swords says, the whole affair “was terrifying.”

1991 Audi 200

“I like fast cars,” said Swords. “I have no issue with going fast in cars. That is insane. That might be one of the fastest-feeling cars I’ve ever been in […] I’m gonna go for a lie-down and change my underwear.”

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Cameron Aubernon

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.

New vs. Old: Audi e-tron Sportback Races a V12-powered Q7 TDI

New vs. Old: Audi e-tron Sportback Races a V12-powered Q7 TDI

Mat Watson of CarWow drag races an Audi e-tron Sportback against a 2009 Q7 TDI equipped with a 6-liter V12 motor.

In one of CarWow‘s most recent videos, the YouTube channel uses the age-old rivalry between old and new as a parameter to investigate how an Audi e-tron Sportback fares against a first-generation Q7 (facelift model). The latter is propelled by a 6-liter V12 TDI diesel engine which produced 493 HP of maximum power and 738 lb-ft of peak torque in its factory tune.

CarWow’s presenter Mat Watson was quite impressed by the diesel Q7. Watson recently also proclaimed that the Q4e-tron is the best electric SUV on sale. Even though the e-tron Sportback is more powerful than its smaller sibling, it is still no match for the Q7 TDI, when it comes to the overall power output. The all-electric SUV produces 405 HP of power and around 490 lb-ft of torque. So it would seem that a drag race between the two models would favor the internal combustion model.

However, Watson was quick to highlight that “the idea behind this race is to show just how fast these latest electric cars are compared to internal combustion engines.” At 5,390 lbs the Sportback is much lighter than the V12 Q7, which weighs around 5,809 lbs. Thanks to its electric-only powertrain, the Sportback should also accelerate much faster than the Q7 TDI. Unsurprisingly, Watson also shared our opinion. “It could be a very close race. This (e-tron Sportback) will get off the line very very well, not sure how that (V12 Q7 TDI) will get off the line,” said Watson.

New vs. Old: Audi e-tron Sportback Races a V12-powered Q7 TDI

After an underwhelming soundcheck, both cars lined up for the first bout where the Q7 TDI proved to be victorious, on the account of a driver’s error.  Mat’s reaction time cost him the first race. “I held on the brake, and it just didn’t go very well,” explained Watson. Luckily, the drivers agreed to race a couple of more times, and on both occasions, the e-tron Sportback won the race with a quarter-mile time of 13.5 seconds.

The Q7 TDI made up for its losses by beating the e-tron Sportback in back-to-back rolling drag races, but the battery-powered model performed better in brake tests thanks to regenerative braking. Overall, CarWow’s latest webisode offers a thrilling ride and keeps the viewers on their toes throughout the video.

Image Source: CarWow

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Stunning Audi Coupe S/GT Heats Up the Swedish Landscape

1972 Audi Coupe S/GT

Five thousand hours of work results in an Audi Coupe S/GT with tons of custom details, several more tons of ice-cold Teutonic vibes.

Today, every Audi brings sportiness to the table, even at the A/Q level. Of course, a jump to the S or RS levels cranks up the performance to match, but it’s safe to say that any Audi model will get plenty of looks on the street. There’s just something about the cool, Teutonic vibes every machine possesses in their styling.

Style, of course, has always been a part of Audi’s DNA. And it doesn’t get any more ice-cold than this 1972 Coupe S/GT from Sweden. Auditography waited quite a while to capture this custom stunner. It’s safe to say it was more than worth it.

1972 Audi Coupe S/GT

“Okay. So this is one of those that I have to pinch myself again,” wrote the photographer in the description. “This car, right here, has been on my radar for a few years. It’s a one-off 1972 Audi 100 Coupè S/GT, that is custom-made with the craziest details on this planet. This project required over 5000 working hours, and the attention to detail is insane. I really think that this is one of the most beautiful cars ever. It’s Audi’s Eleanor.”

And there are, indeed, tons of details to go over. First of all, it rides upon a custom air suspension, allowing the owner, Niklas Frisk, to go low and slow through the streets of Malmo. The engine is original, but tuned to get all 136 horses charging out of the corral through a four-speed manual. And though it doesn’t wear a gray like Nardo Gray, the Aston Martin-derived Casino Royale fits the Audi beautifully.

1972 Audi Coupe S/GT

The custom touches continue inside, too. The Audi’s leather-wrapped dash with white stitching is too cool, and excellently frames the set of custom Speed Hut gauges. The seating, meanwhile, was rebuilt to bring more racing vibes to the cabin, and the old wood trim was replaced by aluminum. The fuel door was moved to the C-pillar, and uses a door from a Victory motorcycle, Volkswagen Golf Mk3 brakes stop the whole thing, and Golf Mk1 fender bits cover the 18-inch wheels.

1972 Audi Coupe S/GT

“We did an awesome shoot that will forever be remembered,” wrote the photographer. “This is probably the coolest Audi I’ve ever seen in my life.”

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Cameron Aubernon

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.

Audi of America Reports Record Sales in Q2 2021

Audi of America Reports Record Sales in Q2 2021

Audi of America achieved new milestones as the auto group’s second-quarter deliveries increased by 92.3% YoY in Q2 2021.

Just like the rest of the world, the automotive industry was also not impervious to the effects of the ongoing global pandemic. Surprisingly enough, as many car brands struggled to manage the fallout of the devastating COVID-19 crisis, subsidiaries of the Volkswagen Group somehow managed to achieve record sales. As we reported earlier in April, VW’s supercar sub-brand Lamborghini closed its first quarter of the year by setting yet another sales record. Audi of America has now announced that it also managed to achieve multiple sales and delivery records in Q2 2021.

With 66,995 units sold in the second quarter of 2021, Audi of America recorded a 92.3% increase in deliveries as compared to Q2 2020. The auto group also announced that its year-to-date sales were up by 59.9% YoY, with 121,835 units sold. This was also Audi’s “best first-half sales results” and “strongest quarterly sales results” of all time. It is worth noting that the company’s high-riding offerings were also its best-selling products during this period, which acts as a testament to the popularity of the SUV and crossover segment in the U.S.

Audi of America Reports Record Sales in Q2 2021

Having achieved these impressive milestones, the company also shared its goals for the rest of the year. “In 2020, Audi sold 186,620 vehicles in the U.S., and this year, we look forward to the next chapter in our journey to reinvent premium mobility with the arrivals of the fully electric Audi e-tron GT and Audi Q4 e-tron,” Audi of America said.

The Q5 proved to be Audi of America’s MVP with a 133% increase in deliveries during the second quarter of the year and 85% growth in YTD sales. Other models like the Audi Q3 and Q5 also contributed significantly to the sales growth and proved to be crucial in achieving the record-setting results for the second quarter and the first half of 2021. Audi of America did experience a slight decline in the sales of its certified pre-owned vehicles.

The second-quarter deliveries of Audi CPOs dropped down by 2.1% to 14369 units, and the overall CPO sales were down by 3.3% YoY. The Audi Q8 was the most popular certified pre-owned model, and the sales of Q3 and e-tron CPOs also experienced substantial growth during the period.

Image Source: Audi of America

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You’ve Come a Long Way, Audi: Coupe Quattro Retro Review

1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

Today, Audi delivers the best in performance luxury with all-wheel drive. The 1990 Coupe Quattro was an inkling of greatness to come.

Whenever you visit an Audi dealership today, you’ll see only the best Ingolstadt has to offer. Luxury, performance, and, of course, the legendary quattro all-wheel drive, all in whatever package you’d like. Those who prefer to keep things chill have the A models, while those who want all the power head straight to the RS lineup. Meanwhile, the S machines attract those looking for the right balance of luxury and excitement.

This wasn’t always the case, though. Audi had to work to get to where it is now, the inklings of greatness to come emerging through models like the 1990 Coupe Quattro. Let’s see what MotorWeek thought of it, while pointing out how far things have come along in 30 years.

1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

“When Audi introduced their first quattro back in 1980, a lot of people just couldn’t figure out why anyone would want all-wheel drive capability in a sport coupe,” said John Davis. “Now, virtually every car company is offering at least one model with all-wheel drive.”

Of course, none could offer a combo of all-wheel drive, performance and luxury like Audi could back in the day. That said, Audi was still earning its dues back then. For one example, the Coupe Quattro didn’t have a turbo, and the driver could still manually lock the rear diff for slippery conditions. Not to mention the five-cylinder engine, a quirk long since phased out in favor of inline-fours, V6s and V8s (and, in the case of the R8, V10s). Meanwhile, today’s quattro handles all of the locking and unlocking on its own, and turbos can be found in all but the A models.

1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

“The engine builds power slowly at first,” said Davis. “This is not the kind of car that impresses anyone running away from a stop light. But once the tachometer needle approaches the 4,000-mark, things being to happen.”

Even the 2021 A4 Sedan with the 2.0-liter inline-four bests the Coupe Quattro off the line, reach 60 mph over 3 seconds faster. Of course, that inline-five on the Coupe Quattro sounds pretty boss. And while burnouts aren’t going to be a thing with quattro, beasting over the competition still is, especially when rides like the RS 6 Avant and RS Q8 leave the rest in the dust.

1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

“Priced at $29,750, the Coupe Quattro includes leather, wood, power windows, power door locks, a security system, and more,” said Davis. “All the amenities you’d normally see on luxury sedans.”

One of the amenities no longer available? The Audi ski sack, located in the center of the rear seat on the Coupe Quattro. Instead, you can just fold down the seats to set your skis down. Meanwhile, the tech of today’s Audis is a far cry from the “Seventies American sedan” look for the HVAC controls. Not to mention the fact that once upon a time, everything was a button or a knob.

All in all, it’s neat to see what Audi was like back in the day. Especially when we’ve got the Audi we have now.

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Cameron Aubernon

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.