Watch out for deer as mating season approaches

Gareth Herincx

1 day ago
Auto News

Deer crossing road - GEM Motoring Assist

Road safety organisation GEM Motoring Assist is advising drivers to take extra care in areas where deer are common, as their breeding season gets underway.

The coming weeks (the breeding season lasts until early November) mean deer are more mobile than usual, bringing them onto roads and increasing the risk of collisions.

Experts believe the UK deer population numbers more than two million, but research from National Highways shows around 75,000 deer are involved in vehicle collisions each year, with 10,000 killed instantly.

The human death toll from deer collisions ranges between 10 and 20 annually, and industry estimates put the cost of damage to vehicles alone to be at least £17 million.

“We encourage drivers to be extra observant, especially as the mornings and evenings get darker,” said GEM Chief Executive Neil Worth. “Be ready to take appropriate avoiding action if you come across a deer on the road ahead.

“Periods of highest deer activity tend to occur at dawn and dusk, coinciding with the morning and evening rush hour, increasing collision risks in areas where deer are common.”

Six simple tips for drivers to reduce risk from deer collisions

  1. Take note of deer warning signs. These are placed in locations where wild animal crossings are likely, so keep your speed down and be ready to encounter a deer at very short notice.
  2. Be particularly watchful at dawn and dusk, when deer are most active.
  3. If you spot one animal, it’s likely there may be others following, so don’t speed up and assume the danger has passed.
  4. Remember the importance of always being able to stop – on your side of the road – in the distance you can see to be clear ahead. But also be ready to react if a deer leaps out right in front of you
  5. Ideally we want to avoid any sort of collision, but swerving to avoid a deer could prove a very dangerous action if it leads to a collision with another vehicle.
  6. If you hit a deer, stop somewhere safe and report the collision to the police, who can organize professional veterinary assistance.

Check Also


Land Rover Defender 75th Limited Edition

Meet the Land Rover Defender 75th Limited Edition

Land Rover is marking the 75th anniversary of its legendary 4×4 with £85,995 limited edition …

How the cost-of-living crisis is making our roads safer

Gareth Herincx

3 days ago
Auto News

Driving a car

Soaring fuel costs have left a hole in the pocket of motorists across the country, but it could be having an unexpected positive impact on UK road safety.

According to latest research commissioned by the UK’s largest independent road safety charity, IAM RoadSmart, it’s thought millions of motorists have changed their driving habits for the better.

Of the 1,004 motorists surveyed, 72% stated that they had changed how they travel due to travel costs. Of this number, 38% said that they now drive more economically as a result of rising fuel costs, while almost one in five (19%) have taken extra care to stick to the speed limit.

In other words, up to 12.5m UK motorists are driving more economically and some six million have adopted slower or smoother driving habits in recent times.

“The rising cost of fuel is yet another added expenditure in this difficult cost of living crisis, and our research demonstrates that many have been forced to rethink their driving habits in an effort to keep their fuel costs to a minimum,” said Neil Greig, Director of Policy and Research at IAM RoadSmart.

“Driving slower and more economically will no doubt help keep the pain at the pumps down, but another positive impact of this is, of course, road safety. We would urge those who have adopted slower and smoother driving habits to maintain these habits, regardless of fuel prices. This way, motorists will not only save money on fuel and travel greener, but also potentially save lives.”

Check Also


1964 Aston Martin DB5 Convertible

Historic Aston Martin DB5 Convertible for sale

A 1964 Aston Martin DB5 Convertible, ordered and owned by the man who gave his …

How the cost-of-living crisis is making our roads safer

Gareth Herincx

7 days ago
Auto News

Driving a car

Soaring fuel costs have left a hole in the pocket of motorists across the country, but it could be having an unexpected positive impact on UK road safety.

According to latest research commissioned by the UK’s largest independent road safety charity, IAM RoadSmart, it’s thought millions of motorists have changed their driving habits for the better.

Of the 1,004 motorists surveyed, 72% stated that they had changed how they travel due to travel costs. Of this number, 38% said that they now drive more economically as a result of rising fuel costs, while almost one in five (19%) have taken extra care to stick to the speed limit.

In other words, up to 12.5m UK motorists are driving more economically and some six million have adopted slower or smoother driving habits in recent times.

“The rising cost of fuel is yet another added expenditure in this difficult cost of living crisis, and our research demonstrates that many have been forced to rethink their driving habits in an effort to keep their fuel costs to a minimum,” said Neil Greig, Director of Policy and Research at IAM RoadSmart.

“Driving slower and more economically will no doubt help keep the pain at the pumps down, but another positive impact of this is, of course, road safety. We would urge those who have adopted slower and smoother driving habits to maintain these habits, regardless of fuel prices. This way, motorists will not only save money on fuel and travel greener, but also potentially save lives.”

Check Also


Valtteri Bottas in Milan with Alfa Romeo F1

Valtteri Bottas wakes up Milan

F1 star Valtteri Bottas has helped Alfa Romeo celebrate its 112th anniversary with a unique …

Drowsy drivers survey rings alarm bells

Gareth Herincx

1 day ago
Auto News

Four million drivers have momentarily fallen asleep behind the wheel, shocking new research by IAM RoadSmart has revealed.

The study for the UK’s largest independent road safety charity is alarming because even the briefest lapse in concentration when driving can have devastating consequences because at 70mph a car travels at more than 100 feet per second.

One in 10 drivers surveyed admitted to momentarily closing their eyes because they were so tired, while more than half (equating to some 20 million motorists) said they were very concerned about fatigue when driving long distances.

Other results from the research revealed that one in 10 drivers admitted that they had hit the rumble strip, while 40% had turned down the heating or rolled down the windows in order to stop them from being tired.

On a slightly more positive note, around a quarter of drivers had pulled over for a rest and/or a coffee.

“Fatigue behind the wheel is a very serious problem, perhaps more concerning than previously thought of,” said Neil Greig, IAM RoadSmart Director of Policy & Research.

“It is shocking to think a potential four million drivers have closed their eyes behind the wheel because they were so tired, even if it was just for a short time. The potential carnage that could result from even one accident doesn’t bear thinking about.

“Driving a long distance needs pre-planning to ensure there are plenty of available rest places and to make sure there’s enough time to complete the journey if delays are encountered.

Never drive for longer than two hours without a break and take particular care if driving when you would normally be asleep. This is even more important as the country reopens after the pandemic and not all facilities may be available yet.

“Drivers can then concentrate on staying alert behind the wheel rather than staving off tiredness by trying to reach their end destination without adequate rest breaks.”

Check Also


Renault's drive for clean school air

Renault’s drive for clean school air

More than half of drivers would be willing to take a different route on their …