Audi B5 RS4 Packs 470-HP Punch to Overcome Its Flaws

2001 Audi RS4 Avant

In spite of its flaws, the first RS4 holds up against the modern era of high performance in part because of its lack of high-tech features.

Following the end of the RS2 Avant in 1995, Audi fans had a long wait until the team at Ingolstadt developed a proper successor. After four years, one arrived: the RS4. While the United States received the B7 version between 2006 and 2008, Europe has enjoyed all four generations of one of the hottest Audis ever built, including the current B9 RS4 Avant.

Which begs the question: what of the B5 RS4 Avant? Does it hold up as well today as it did at the turn of the millennium? JayEmm on Cars seeks the answer with a modded 2001 RS4 Avant.

2001 Audi RS4 Avant

“Although they were certainly quick as standard,” said JayEmm, “posting a sub-5-second naught to 60 time, one of the things that made these cars was just how tunable they are. And this particular example is not standard.”

The 2.7-liter turbocharged V6 that once made 370 horsepower, thanks to tuning and a freer-flowing exhaust, it makes 470 horses. The RS4’s been lowered, and has front brakes from a Volkswagen Phaeton to better stopping power. This is also one of 530 B5 RS4s to come over to the United Kingdom, and one of 400 in right-hand drive. Its styling, meanwhile, doesn’t scream performance, unlike nearly Audi on the showroom floor now. But is owning an B5 RS4 worth it?

2001 Audi RS4 Avant

“I’ve been tempted by the S and RS4 of this generation a number of times in the past,” said JayEmm. “But there’s one really big reason I was always put off of them […] What’s put me off buying one of these in the past is the absolutely extraordinary running costs. For whatever reason, nearly everybody I talk to that owns, or has owned, one of these cars is always trying to put something right with it.”

That said, the RS4 Avant offers a few things newer ones don’t, like a six-speed manual. The ability to shift one’s own gears is a throwback to how things were in the 2000s: few electronics, more mechanicals, more connectedness. Today’s Audis, meanwhile, seem to handle everything for the driver, which might not be as fun as thought.

2001 Audi RS4 Avant

“Because this car is becoming something of a classic, with a price to match,” said JayEmm, “it becomes ever more difficult to justify it as merely a daily proposition. Yet still, the car has a lot going for it. If you ignore for a moment the fact you could get a much more modern, much more capable, much better-equipped car for the same or less money now, this is really quite a nice thing.”

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.

MUST WATCH: Shop Employee Borrows R8 to Surprise Blind Child at Car Meet

Blind Kid in an Audi R8

In time for some holiday magic, one employee of Only Motorsports takes his boss’s Audi R8 to bring joy to a blind child’s heart.

Do you remember the first time you heard an Audi? Whether it was the turbocharged inline-five of the Ur-Quattro or the rumble of the R8 V10, Ingolstadt knows how to turn on the passion for the four rings of steel for fans of all ages.

And it’s especially magic when a child experiences Audi for the first time. Zach, one of the employees running Only Motorsports’ YouTube channel recently brought that magic to a special car meet put together to give a blind child an experience he’ll never forget.

Shop Employee Borrows R8 to Surprise Blind Child at Car Meet

“It’s Christmas Eve,” he said. “I was at the shop working. I just found out that there is a car meet over at a dealership somewhere. It’s for this kid for Christmas – I think he’s nine or 10 or something – he’s completely blind […] They’re doing a car meet because he loves cars.”

To make things special for the kid, the employee drove his truck to his boss’s house to “borrow” the Audi R8 parked inside. And not just any R8, but an R8 V10. After all, if five cylinders are good, 10 are better.

Shop Employee Borrows R8 to Surprise Blind Child at Car Meet

The gathering at Ford of Murfreesboro in Murfreesboro, Tennessee is filled with all sorts of sensory goodness, mostly of the American V8 variety. Zach’s “gift” to Christian, though, is filled with plenty of Teutonic magic to stamp the four rings of steel upon his heart.

Shop Employee Borrows R8 to Surprise Blind Child at Car Meet

“I’ve never seen an Audi in my life!” said Christian. “That’s loud! Why’s it so loud?”

Christian also noted how the chimes sounded exactly like those on his mom’s Volkswagen. Witnessing the sheer joy from his spirit pop from his time behind the wheel of the R8, though, is exactly why all of us became Audi fans. Being able to share such magic and wonder with a child like Christian is its own reward. In fact, it’s better to just watch the video below than for us to try to put his joy into words. Nothing like witnessing the birth of a new Audi fan.

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.

VIDEO: Six Glorious Minutes of Classic Audi Quattro S1 Noises

Audi Quattro S1 Group B

Words are unnecessary when the Group B legend that is the Audi Quattro S1 turns up for some vintage rallying and hill-climbing fun.

It’s amazing how one small change made such a big impact upon the world. Such was the case with Audi and its then-new quattro all-wheel drive system in the Eighties. Back then, it was novel to send all the power to all corners in a family car, and especially in high-performance cars. Yet, Ingolstadt proved one didn’t need to buy a truck to get the benefits all-wheel drive offered.

And of course, what better way to prove the point than by entering rallying under the FIA’s insane Group B regs. The moment all four wheels carved the quattro name into the dirt, they also etched Audi’s name into history. Thanks to this compilation by Palbo64 Rally & Racing Videos, we get to see – and hear – this history play out on the vintage rallying and hill-climbing circuits, in the form of the Audi Quattro S1.

Audi Quattro S1 Group B

Not only do we see the classic yellow and white livery of the Quattro campaigned by the likes of Michele Moulton and Walter Rohl, but a few other classic paints, too. There’s one with the Audi Sport colors of black, gray and red, of course. Then, there’s the red and white of the Belga team Quattro, once campaigned by famed Belgian driver and co-pilot Marc Duez and Willy Lux.

Audi Quattro S1 Group B

No words are necessary to explain how awesome these machines are. The Audi Quattro S1 more than speaks for itself with every pop, crackle, roar, and chirp from its turbocharged inline-five. The sound of the Group B monster in all its forms gives the angular coupe the proper voice for all of its adventures on paved and unpaved roads. Not to mention exciting the gathered crowds in this day, just as it did at the peak of madness decades ago.

Audi Quattro S1 Group B

The best part of all this, though? The teams who care for and preserve these legends today. Without them, all anyone would have of the Audi Quattro S1 would be historic footage. Long may the legend live.

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.

Audi R8 With Twin-Turbocharger Kit Produces 1276 HP

Audi R8 With Twin-Turbocharger Kit Produces 1276 HP

With the help of a pair of GTX 35 turbochargers and a slew of other performance upgrades, Alex Collins’ Audi R8 can achieve a top speed north of 210 MPH.

We recently reported that the Audi Sport Division will soon make the switch to all-electric mobility. However, even today the Audi R8 with its internal combustion engine is one of the best high-performance machines in the German automaker’s product portfolio. As it turns out, the 5.2-liter motor of the R8 possesses unfathomable performance potential. A recent video from the YouTube channel LivingLife Fast reveals what tremendous power one can harness by tweaking the V10 power plant of an R8.

The car in question is currently the ownership of Alex Collins from QS Tuning, which is a leading German tuning and maintenance company based in West Sussex, UK. The Audi R8 seen in the video is the fifth car to receive a twin-turbo treatment by QS Tuning. The British outfit offers AMS and Boost Logic kits for Audi R8s, and the former is responsible for the performance of Alex’s ride. With some minor tweaks, the 5.2-liter V10 motor now generates 1276 HP of power thanks to a pair of GTX 35 turbochargers.

Audi R8 With Twin-Turbocharger Kit Produces 1276 HP

The breath-taking Audi R8 sports a cool white paint job, which is offset by the 20-inch Vossen MX2 forged wheels that flaunt a polished Brickell bronze finish.

Collin also offers his insights on the sports car in the video. “It’s essentially a pretty much stock car, just with a turbo kit on it. It’s got an in-tank fuel pump upgrade, but it’s still stock injectors, stock rails, stock clutches, stock box, stock driveshafts” said Collins. He further adds,” So, on the dyno, on pump fuel, it makes just under 1100 horsepower that’s it. Then on Renegade 109, it makes 1276 horsepower, so we’re capping the mid-range torque on it just where it’s got the stock clutches.”

According to the owner, this Audi R8 with its twin turbocharger kit can complete a quarter-mile with an exit speed of 159.7 MPH. Alex also claims that the top speed of his R8 is somewhere north of 210 MPH. The car rides on a set of 20-inch Vossen MX2 forged wheels, which flaunt a polished Brickell bronze finish. In its most capable tune, the supercar can accelerate from 0 to 60 MPH in around 2.3 seconds and uses vibrant yellow Ferrari brake calipers for the stopping power.

Image Source: LivingLifeFast, alex_collins98

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Audi 80 B4 Made For Relaxing Drives, Not Spirited ‘Ring Runs

1992 Audi 80 B4

Final-gen Audi 80 sedan smoothed out the lines of the B3 era, retained unique procon-ten safety system in the final days before airbags.

By the early 1990s, the Audi 80 entered the final years of its 30-year run on the production line. The B4 era of the sedan brought a longer wheelbase than the previous B3, a move into the German midsize market against Mercedes and BMW, and two hardcore versions of itself, in the form the S2 and RS2 Avant.

In short, the final Audi 80 heralded plenty of changes for Ingolstadt and fans alike, ones that would pave the way for the Audi we know now. The unnamed host of YouTube channel Furious Driving recently took a pristine 1992 example of the 80 out for a leisurely drive through the English countryside.

1992 Audi 80 B4

“There’s a couple of things that really stick in my mind about this particular thing,” he said. “First of all, how elegant and understated it was. Back then, before I could drive, I always said, ‘If ever I could afford a BMW, I’m gonna buy an Audi or a Saab,’ thinking they were understated and elegant. Not Q cars, exactly, but quiet, refined luxury.”

The other things he found wonderful about the B4 Audi 80? The interesting tech advancements it possessed. Full zinc coating to prevent rust was definitely a plus in more damp areas like Germany or New England. However, it the procon-ten safety system made the 80 stand out. Before airbags took over, procon-ten’s steel cables moved the steering wheel away in a crash. Other cables tightened the seat belts to prevent the occupants from bashing their skulls against the dash or front seats.

1992 Audi 80 B4

“Pulling away in this thing is so very smooth,” he said. “It almost feels like you’re driving an automatic, but just with the intervention of a clutch in the middle of the situation.”

Aside from the smoothness of the five-speed manual, the longitudinally mounted inline-five’s placement over the front axle played a key part in the Audi 80’s excellent handling. Throw in quattro – only available with the manual – and few could touch what this sedan had. However, this wasn’t the machine for throwing down on the ‘Ring. Instead, a different sort of driving experience was on the cards with the B4 80.

1992 Audi 80 B4

“This really isn’t the car you take out for a spirited drive,” he said. “It’s a car you take out if you want to go someplace and get there relaxed. It’s a bit like a Mercedes W124 in that respect. It’s a not a car that’s gonna reward you for hustling it along. Take it easy, and you’re in for a gentle, enjoyable time, like an evening in a gentleman’s club, rather than going to a rave.”

Click HERE to join the AudiWorld forums!

Cameron Aubernon’s path to automotive journalism began in the early New ’10s. Back then, a friend of hers thought she was an independent fashion blogger.

Aubernon wasn’t, so she became one, covering fashion in her own way for the next few years.

From there, she’s written for: Louisville.com/Louisville Magazine, Insider Louisville, The Voice-Tribune/The Voice, TOPS Louisville, Jeffersontown Magazine, Dispatches Europe, The Truth About Cars, Automotive News, Yahoo Autos, RideApart, Hagerty, and Street Trucks.

Aubernon also served as the editor-in-chief of a short-lived online society publication in Louisville, Kentucky, interned at the city’s NPR affiliate, WFPL-FM, and was the de facto publicist-in-residence for a communal art space near the University of Louisville.

Aubernon is a member of the International Motor Press Association, and the Washington Automotive Press Association.