Top 10 most scrapped cars in the UK

Gareth Herincx

12 hours ago
Auto News

Ford-Focus-Mk-2

The Ford Focus was the most scrapped car model in 2022, according to new data from the Scrap Car Comparison service.

The Vauxhall Corsa was revealed as the second most scrapped model, with its larger sibling – the Astra – following in third.

It’s no surprise that the Focus topped the chart for the sixth year running. Go back 14 years (the average age of scrapped vehicles) and it was a time when the family hatchback was flying out of new car showrooms.

New additions to the 2022 list of most scrapped cars include the executive BMW 3 Series (more than the 1 Series, 5 Series and X5s combined), the Ford Transit van and MINI hatch.

Top 10 most scrapped car models in 2022

  1. Ford Focus
  2. Vauxhall Corsa
  3. Vauxhall Astra
  4. Ford Fiesta
  5. Volkswagen Golf
  6. BMW 3 Series
  7. Ford Transit
  8. Mini Hatch (Cooper/One)
  9. Vauxhall Zafira
  10. Renault Clio

Ford was also the most scrapped car manufacturer of 2022, followed by Vauxhall and Volkswagen.

New entry car manufacturers to the Top 10 included German brands BMW, Audi and Mercedes.

Top 10 most scrapped car makes in 2022

  1. Ford
  2. Vauxhall
  3. Volkswagen
  4. Peugeot
  5. Renault
  6. BMW
  7. Citroen
  8. Audi
  9. Toyota
  10. Mercedes

“This is the sixth year running where we’ve seen the Ford Focus come out on top as the most scrapped car, and we expect to see it featuring highly in our most scrapped lists for many years to come,” said said Dan Gick, Managing Director of Scrap Car Comparison.

“Popularity will always have a bearing on which cars are scrapped, and 2022’s results help to spotlight the enduring popularity of the Focus model, even if many do eventually meet the scrap heap.”

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British-built Nissan Qashqai was UK’s bestselling car in 2022

Gareth Herincx

13 hours ago
Auto News

Gold-wrapped Nissan Qashqai

The Nissan Qashqai was the UK’s most popular new car of 2022, and the first British-built model to top the annual sales charts for 24 years.

Figures released by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) confirm that the home-grown Qashqai – which was designed in Paddington, engineered in Cranfield and is built in Sunderland – was the nation’s best-selling car of the last 12 months.

A total of 42,704 new Qashqais were driven off dealership forecourts across the UK in 2022, reported the SMMT.

To celebrate the achievement, an exclusive gold-wrapped Qashqai was created in honour of the 7,000 Nissan employees from around the UK that have contributed to its success.

  1. Nissan Qashqai – 42,704
  2. Vauxhall Corsa – 35,910
  3. Tesla Model Y – 35,551
  4. Ford Puma – 35,088
  5. Mini – 32, 387
  6. Kia Sportage – 29,655
  7. Hyundai Tucson – 27,839
  8. Volkswagen Golf – 26,588
  9. Ford Kuga – 26,549
  10. Ford Fiesta – 25,070

Overall, 1.61 million new cars were registered in the UK in 2022 – the lowest level since 1992.

Although demand for new vehicles remained high, manufacturers struggled to get hold of parts. There were particularly serious problems obtaining semiconductors, which are used in a vast array of electronic systems, from infotainment systems to engine management.

Meanwhile, demand for electric vehicles continued to grow and they accounted for almost a fifth of new car sales.

Registrations rose from 190,700 to 267,000 – with the EV market share climbing from 11.6% to 16.6%.

The Tesla Model Y was the biggest-selling electric vehicle by far, nothing up 35,551 registrations, followed by the Tesla Model 3 (19,071) and Kia Niro (11,197).

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2022 Ford Focus review

Ford Focus review

We road test the new, improved version of the popular Ford Focus – now with mild hybrid assistance available…

The current fourth generation of the Ford Focus five-door family hatchback and estate was launched in 2018 and has just been treated to a mid-life makeover.

Gaining bolder looks, an updated infotainment system and more advanced driver assistance technology, a mild hybrid system is also on offer for the first time.

The update couldn’t have come sooner because the Focus has been slipping down the sales charts as buyers switch to crossovers and fully electric/hybrid cars.

Ford Focus review

It’s also facing serious competition from newer rivals such as the Vauxhall Astra, Peugeot 308, Seat Leon, Mazda 3, Skoda Octavia and Volkswagen Golf.

As before, the freshly facelifted Focus is also available as a sporty ST variant or a rufty-tufty Active version which bridges the gap between conventional family cars and SUVs. 

Priced from £22,965, there’s now a choice of three engines – two petrol and one diesel. The three-cylinder 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol unit, so familiar to Fiesta and Puma owners, is available with outputs of 123bhp or 153bhp. 

Ford Focus review

Mild-hybrid tech is offered as an option on the less powerful version, and included as standard on the higher-output version, helping to boost both performance and efficiency. A choice of six-speed manual or seven-speed automatic are available on both too. 

Accelerating to 60mph takes 10.2 seconds in the 123bhp car, or just 8.2 seconds on the more powerful mild hybrid model. The latter is the most efficient, returning a decent 54.3mpg, with CO2 emissions of 116g/km. 

If performance is more important to you, then go for the Focus ST hot hatch, which benefits from a 2.3-litre petrol engine delivering 276bhp and a 0-60mph time of just 5.7 seconds.

Ford Focus review

High-mileage drivers still have the option of a diesel – a 118bhp 1.5-litre unit that comes with either a six-speed manual or eight-speed automatic transmission. 

A 9.6-second 0-60mph sprint time is possible, while Ford claims an impressive 61.4mpg fuel economy figure (CO2 emissions as low as 120g/km).

My test car came in high spec ST-Line Vignale trim and was fitted with the 153bhp version of Ford’s punchy 1.0-litre turbo petrol engine, paired with a six-speed manual gearbox.

Ford Focus review

The refreshed front end adds kerb appeal to the Focus, while overall it has a more athletic stance. The sporty ST-Line models look especially good with a body kit that includes a rear diffuser and spoiler. 

The interior has been smartened up too with all trim levels getting the much improved SYNC 4 13.2-inch landscape-oriented touchscreen infotainment system.

Even though it now incorporates the car’s heating and ventilation controls, it’s slick, colourful and easy to use. Every Focus also now comes with digital dials.

Advanced driver assistance technologies include Blind Spot Assist which can help prevent a driver switching lanes if a potential collision is detected.

Ford Focus review

Before I proceed, let’s just be clear that the 48-volt mild hybrid system used in the Focus is pretty basic. Unlike plug-in and full hybrids, it cannot drive the car alone. 

Instead, it boosts engine acceleration and aids fuel economy (though that’s marginal), and it drives just like an ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) car, so no plugging in to charge the small battery.

However, when rivals such as the all-new Vauxhall Astra and Peugeot 308 are available as plug-in hybrids (with all-electric versions to follow in 2023), the Focus is barely keeping up and will lose out in the all-important business sector where lower CO2 levels means big tax benefits.

Ford Focus review

That said, there are plenty of drivers who are not ready (or can’t) make the switch to plug-in and electric vehicles, or simply prefer conventional cars for now, so there is still a place for the Focus.

And here’s the thing – I’ve driven dozens of full hybrid, plug-in hybrid, 100% electric vehicles (EVs) and SUVs with indifferent dynamics, so the Focus’s blend of driver engagement and practicality is a real treat.

Not only does it look the part, but there’s plenty of space inside for five adults, plus the boot is a competitively sized 375 litres (rising to 1,354 litres with the rear seats folded). There’s also a lovely low driving position should you want it – an impossibility in most EVs and SUVs.

Ford Focus review

Then there’s the famed handling characteristics of the Ford Focus. It’s fun to drive, feeling agile and planted with sharp steering and loads of grip.

Push it in faster corners and where some rivals will become unsettled, the Focus takes it in its stride.

That’s not all, the lively little engine punches way above its weight, providing ample power, the slick six-speed manual gearbox is an absolute joy to use and the brakes are reassuringly reactive.

Ford Focus review

The ride is on the firm side, but not uncomfortably so, while the build quality is hard to fault and cabin refinement is excellent.

Three selectable drive modes – normal, sport and eco – add to the overall driving experience.

Verdict: The Ford Focus is a fantastically well sorted car. Fun to drive, stylish, practical, comfortable, economical, and now featuring a  bang up to date infotainment system, it’s still one of the best family hatchbacks on the market.

Ford UK

Skoda Fabia review

Skoda Fabia

We road test the all-new Skoda Fabia hatchback – a impressive car that’s shaking up the supermini sector…

The latest Skoda Fabia is quite simply one of the best small hatchbacks on the market. An alternative to the ubiquitous Ford Fiesta and Vauxhall Corsa, it’s a fantastic all-round package.

Of course, no car is perfect, and the fourth-generation Fabia is no exception. For instance, it’s a petrol-only range, with no hybrid choice. In this day and age, it seems odd to be coasting and braking and NOT harvesting energy otherwise lost.

Skoda Fabia

However, not everyone is ready to go hybrid or fully electric, and many can’t afford the extra upfront cost or fit a home charger, so for now conventional ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) cars are still the most popular new car option.

Only offered as a five-door hatchback (there’s no estate version this time round), it comes in cool colours (Phoenix Orange and Race Blue especially) and there’s a sporty Monte Carlo version topping the range.

The Fabia is longer than its predecessor, and the boot (up by 50 litres to 380 litres) is claimed to be the largest of any supermini on sale today.

Skoda Fabia

Its more grown-up, aerodynamic design brings it more closely into line with other newer Skodas, including the Octavia and Scala,

Priced from £17,800, there’s a choice of either a 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol engine with a choice of three outputs (64, 94 or 108bhp), or a 1.5-litre four-cylinder (148bhp) unit available in the flagship Monte Carlo.

The two entry-level 1.0-litres get a five-speed manual gearbox, while the more powerful version gets a six-speed, though a seven-speed DSG automatic can also be specified.

Skoda Fabia

We tested the 1.0-litre with the biggest output paired with the twin-clutch auto gearbox. Capable of up to 50.7mpg, CO2 emissions are as low as 126g/km, while 0-62mph takes 9.8 seconds and top speed is 126mph.

Inside, it’s attractive, well-built and offers lots of space. Up front there’s a large central floating touchscreen (there are three sizes, depending on how much you spend) with clear graphics. It’s well equipped too, though again, you get what you pay for.

It’s also packed with safety and driver assistance systems, helping it earn a maximum five stars in Euro NCAP crash tests (there are three separate ISOFIX mounting points in the rear, plus the option for top and bottom mountings for the front passenger seat).

Skoda Fabia

It’s easy to find a comfortable driving position, and while there is extra room in the back, taller passengers might still struggle for legroom. However, overall, it’s excellently packaged. with plenty of smaller storage spaces too.

As we’ve already mentioned, the boot is huge for a car of this size. In fact, it’s comparable to some vehicles in the Ford Focus class above.

On the road it’s a surprisingly refined experience, and it’s clearly been designed more for comfort than performance.

Skoda Fabia

That said, it’s a punchy little engine and feels quicker than the official figures suggest. Spirited drivers can still have some fun in the Fabia because it handles well with ample front-end grip, while body roll is kept well in check.

The steering is light and it’s a doddle to drive in town, but it’s also a fine cruiser. The DSG works well enough, but it can be a little hesitant to change through the gears if you’re in a hurry. Skoda expects most buyers to opt for the six-speed manual anyway.

We achieved the magic 50mpg on a long run with mixed roads, so driven sensibly, the Fabia will reward you with lower running costs.

Skoda Fabia

Add Skoda’s hard-won reputation for reliability and the new Fabia is right up there with the best of them, even if there isn’t a hint of electrification.

Verdict: The all-new Skoda Fabia is a cracking little car. Attractive, affordable and delivering plenty of space, comfort and on-board technology, it’s pleasant, easy to drive and well worth a test drive.

Skoda UK

Skoda Fabia

Used car market slows as buyers tighten belts

Home / Auto News / Used car market slows as buyers tighten belts

Gareth Herincx

15 hours ago
Auto News

Sales of used cars dropped in the second quarter of 2022, with more than 407,000 fewer vehicles changing hands than in the same period last year.

A total of 1,759,684 used car sales took place between April and June – an 18.8% fall – according to new figures published by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT).

Petrol and diesel cars remained dominant during the quarter and accounted for 95.6% of sales, while sales of electric vehicles (EVs) rose by 57% to take 1% of the used market. Plug-in hybrids grew by 1% and hybrids fell by 4%.

Ford Fiesta ST

The Ford Fiesta was the most popular second-hand car in Q2, with transactions totalling 71,429, followed by the Vauxhall Corsa (57,306) and Volkswagen Golf (54,268).

Black was the most popular colour for a used car, followed by blue and grey. Pink cars proved the least popular overall.

Top 10 used cars (April-June 2022)

  1. Ford Fiesta – 71,429
  2. Vauxhall Corsa – 57,306
  3. Volkswagen Golf – 54,268
  4. Ford Focus – 54,144
  5. MINI – 42,268
  6. Vauxhall Astra – 41,277
  7. BMW 3 Series – 40,365
  8. Volkswagen Polo – 33,179
  9. Audi A3 – 29,888
  10. BMW 1 Series – 28,894

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Gareth is a versatile journalist, copywriter and digital editor who’s worked across the media in newspapers, magazines, TV, teletext, radio and online. After long stints at the BBC, GMTV and ITV, he now specialises in motoring.

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