Evolution of Hybrid Cars

Rising in popularity in recent years, you could easily mistake hybrid cars as one the latest trend of mod cons to hit our roads! With cars such as Toyota Prius taking place in popular culture, it may surprise you to learn how long inventors have been exploring the idea of Hybrid cars. We are looking at the evolution of hybrid vehicles.

 1830s- Robert Anderson builds the first electric car

The first ever electric vehicle was built and introduced between 1832-1839. Unlike other vehicles at the time Andersons invention did not run on literal horse power. Instead this four-wheeled electric carriage connected a motor to non-rechargeable power cells.

1901- Ferdinand Porsche builds the first ever hybrid car

The German automotive innovator creates the worlds first hybrid car in 1901. Named after the inventor, the Lorde-Porches Mixet hybrid combined an internal combustion engine with electric motors located in the wheel hubs.

1913- The takeover of gasoline cars

Gasoline- self-starter cars take over and dominate the automobile industry, while sales of electric and steam-powered cars drop in this period. This drop subsequently leads to a decline in hybrid innovation for 50 years.

1969- The plug-in car arrives

The late 60’s seen General Motors reveal several hybrids cars. The first vehicle revealed was the GM’s commuter XP512h which uses a gasoline/electric drivetrain. The company then went to rework the design and introduced the XP- 883 in 1969 with a two-cylinder engine and a plug that fit into a standard wall socket. The electric powered up to 16km after which gas engine would take over.

1990- NiMH batteries charge up the market

In 1967 the development of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries began. The cells of hundreds of high-powered charge-discharge cycles. Thanks to the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) investing $90 million into the battery, the technology was later improved in the 80’s and was featured in electric and hybrid cars in the 90s.

Modern day

Not so long ago, hybrids were the reserve of environmentally conscious school run mums, people living or working under the London congestion charge, and taxi drivers looking to save a bit of money on fuel.

However, with an ever-growing number of hybrids on the market, they are increasingly becoming a mainstream alternative to conventional petrol and diesel models. Hybrid is ditching the practical image and is slowly becoming the new cool kid on the block, with manufacturers such Mercedes, Mitsubishi and BMW releasing groundbreaking models, the evolution of hybrid vehicles is set to keep breaking boundaries.

Evolution of Hybrid Cars

Rising in popularity in recent years, you could easily mistake hybrid cars as one the latest trend of mod cons to hit our roads! With cars such as Toyota Prius taking place in popular culture, it may surprise you to learn how long inventors have been exploring the idea of Hybrid cars. We are looking at the evolution of hybrid vehicles, in partnership with Go Green Leasing.

 1830s- Robert Anderson builds the first electric car

The first ever electric vehicle was built and introduced between 1832-1839. Unlike other vehicles at the time Andersons invention did not run on literal horse power. Instead this four-wheeled electric carriage connected a motor to non-rechargeable power cells.

1901- Ferdinand Porsche builds the first ever hybrid car

The German automotive innovator creates the worlds first hybrid car in 1901. Named after the inventor, the Lorde-Porches Mixet hybrid combined an internal combustion engine with electric motors located in the wheel hubs.

1913- The takeover of gasoline cars

Gasoline- self-starter cars take over and dominate the automobile industry, while sales of electric and steam-powered cars drop in this period. This drop subsequently leads to a decline in hybrid innovation for 50 years.

1969- The plug-in car arrives

The late 60’s seen General Motors reveal several hybrids cars. The first vehicle revealed was the GM’s commuter XP512h which uses a gasoline/electric drivetrain. The company then went to rework the design and introduced the XP- 883 in 1969 with a two-cylinder engine and a plug that fit into a standard wall socket. The electric powered up to 16km after which gas engine would take over.

1990- NiMH batteries charge up the market

In 1967 the development of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries began. The cells of hundreds of high-powered charge-discharge cycles. Thanks to the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) investing $90 million into the battery, the technology was later improved in the 80’s and was featured in electric and hybrid cars in the 90s.

Modern day

Not so long ago, hybrids were the reserve of environmentally conscious school run mums, people living or working under the London congestion charge, and taxi drivers looking to save a bit of money on fuel.

However, with an ever-growing number of hybrids on the market, they are increasingly becoming a mainstream alternative to conventional petrol and diesel models. Hybrid is ditching the practical image and is slowly becoming the new cool kid on the block, with manufacturers such Mercedes, Mitsubishi and BMW releasing ground breaking models, the evolution of hybrid vehicles is set to keep breaking boundaries.

Continue reading Evolution of Hybrid Cars

How to scrap your car and what to do next

If you decide to scrap your car, it can become confusing as to where to take your vehicle, what you can and cannot accept cash for, and who you need to send relevant documentation to so you do not end up with any fines.

The first thing to know is that when you have decided your vehicle has reached the end of his life and it is unsaleable then, if you want to scrap it, this has to be carried out by an Authorised Treatment Facility – also known as a ATF.

If you have a personalised number plate on the car you wish to scrap you can apply to the Driver Licence and Vehicle Agency – which can be done online – to either transfer it to another vehicle or hold on to it until you want to use it again in the future. The number plate will be retained in the name of the registered keeper. It costs £80 to do this.

Then once you have taken your car to an ATF you will need to give them the V5C registration certificate – also known as a log book – but remember to keep the yellow slip, called the V5C/4, from the documentation.

The ATF will pay you the scrap value of your vehicle but it is illegal to be paid in cash by them and this should be refused if offered to you. They will also need to provide you with a Certificate of Destruction within seven days. This is proof that you have given the ATF your car to scrap. You could, otherwise, be liable for traffic offence penalties and vehicle tax.

If the ATF decide to keep the car, repair it and resell it, you will not receive a Certificate of Destruction and can be paid in cash.

If you have sold your car to a motor trader you will need your V5C/3, which will have your 11 digit reference number on it, to tell the DVLA who will then send you a confirmation email or letter, and refund any full months of tax that is owed to you.

There are other ways to notify the DVLA. If you have a V5C you must get the trader to complete their details on the V5C/3, sign the V5C (along with the trader) before sending the V5C/3 to the DVLA.

If you do not have a V5C you must write to the DVLA with the vehicle registration number, make and model, exact date of sale, name and address of the new keeper and signatures of the buyer and seller.
m/f

Please note this guide is based on car owners who want to scrap their cars without keeping any of the parts. There are different rules in place if you wish to scrap your car and keep the parts.