Kia EV6 crowned Car of the Year

Gareth Herincx

3 days ago
Auto News

Kia EV6 - Car of the Year

The game-changing Kia EV6 has been named Europe’s top car at a ceremony in Geneva, Switzerland.

Already widely acclaimed, the electric vehicle beat seven other cars that had made it to the final round of the contest.

The 61-member jury, made up of automotive journalists from 23 countries, voted as follows:

  1. Kia EV6 – 279 points
  2. Renault Mégane E-Tech Electric – 265 points
  3. Hyundai Ioniq 5 – 261 points
  4. Peugeot 308 – 191 points
  5. Skoda Enyaq iV – 185 points
  6. Ford Mustang Mach-E – 150 points
  7. Cupra Born – 144 points

“It’s a nice surprise to see the Kia EV6 receive this award,” said the President of the jury, Frank Janssen.

“It was about time that the brand and the group were rewarded, as they have worked so hard on this car. Kia’s pace of progress is really impressive.”

Kia EV6 review

Offering up to 328 miles of range, super-fast charging capability, space, refinement and a class-leading warranty, the boldy styled EV6’s other awards include the What Car? Car of the Year 2022 trophy in January.

A delighted Jason Jeong, President at Kia Europe, added: “The EV6 is truly a landmark development that’s been designed from the outset to make electric mobility fun, convenient and accessible by combining a highly impressive real-world driving range, ultra-fast charging capabilities, a spacious high-tech interior and a truly rewarding driving experience.

“The EV6 is an exciting sign of what’s still to come in our evolving electrified line-up.”

The prestigious Car of the Year award was established in 1964, when the Rover 2000 took top honours. The Toyota Yaris claimed the top prize last year, while the 2019 winner was the pure electric Jaguar I-Pace.

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Kia Sportage review

Kia Sportage review

Kia ended 2021 on a high with a record UK market share of 5.5% before getting off to a cracking start in 2022.

The South Korean brand finished January as the best-selling brand (9.1% share) – a first in its 30-year history.

This success was led by the Kia Sportage, which was January’s most popular car overall, having ended 2021 as the ninth best-selling popular new car.

Kia Sportage review

It’s remarkable that this family favourite was still flying out of the showrooms in 2021 and early 2022 because these were the last of the fourth generation Sportage (originally launched in 2016) models.

Which brings us to the all-new Mk 5 Sportage – one of the most striking new crossovers on the road.

Rocking a bold, confident new design, hi-tech interior and a range of petrol, diesel and hybrid (mild, self-charging) engines (with a plug-in to follow), the range is priced from £26,745 to £38,445.

Kia Sportage review

There are five trim levels (2, GT-Line, 3, 4 and GT-Line S) and it will do battle the likes of the Volkswagen Tiguan, Hyundai Tucson, Nissan Qashqai and Suzuki S-Cross.

There’s no doubt that the new Sportage has serious road presence, echoing some of the futuristic styling cues of its pure electric big brother, the EV6.

Inside, the change is just as radical with a smart two-screen infotainment set-up. As standard, there’s a an 8.0-inch main touchscreen with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay and additional digital driver’s display on the right. From GT-Line spec up there’s a larger 12.3-inch screen in the centre.

Kia Sportage review

The curved console is clear, bright, responsive and intuitive to use, partly down to the short-cut buttons below the screen.

We tested three variants (all using a 1.6-litre turbocharged petrol engine) – the entry-level with no electrical assistance, followed by the mild hybrid and the self-charging (or full) hybrid.

Four-wheel drive is available with any of the hybridised models, which are only fitted with automatic gearboxes, while the regular 1.6-litre car only comes with a manual box.

Kia Sportage review

Apart from the obvious kerb appeal, the first thing you notice about the new Sportage is that it’s a little longer, wider and taller than the outgoing car and there’s more room inside.

Overall, it has a more mature, sharper look, it’s well put together, has a quality feel and is generously equipped.

In fact, there’s plenty of space for adults front and back, while the luggage capacity is an impressive 587 litres, expanding to a huge 1,780 litres when the 40:20:40 split rear seats are flipped.

Kia Sportage review

On the road, the Sportage is easy to drive with light steering and good all-round visibility. It would be wrong to say it has the most sophisticated ride thanks to its firm suspension settings, but it does the job and remains reasonably flat when pushed in more challenging corners.

The only slight disappointment is the 1.6-litre T-GDi engine which isn’t the most engaging of units and can be vocal when pushed- a shame because the Sportage is a refined cruiser.

For the record, the conventional engine’s 148bhp is good enough for a 0-60mph sprint time of 9.9 seconds, while the mild hybrid (same engine power, but with 48V battery assistance) is slightly faster (9.4 seconds).

Kia Sportage review

What’s more, on paper the claimed fuel consumption of the basic petrol turbo is 41.5mpg, compared to 40.4mpg for the mild hybrid (though in real world driving you won’t get near 40mpg), so I’m not sure that the latter is worth the extra expense.

Puzzlingly, the CO2 emissions for the all-wheel-drive mild hybrid I drove were higher (158g/km) than the regular petrol (154g/km), so where’s the benefit?

The six-speed manual has an easy shift action, while the automatic options (seven-speed dual-clutch and traditional six-speed torque-converter) are suitably smooth for the mild and full hybrids.

Kia Sportage review

Obviously, if money is not the main concern, then the full hybrid is the most tempting model in the range (until the plug-in hybrid version comes along) – especially if your journeys tend to be longer. There’s extra poke, it’s a more relaxed drive generally and EV mode kicks in at low speeds or when manoeuvring.

The front-wheel drive version I tested delivers a combined 226bhp, a 0-60mph time of 7.7 seconds, fuel economy of up to 48.7mpg and emissions as low as 132g/km.

The Sportage is packed with the latest safety and driver assistance kit including autonomous emergency braking (AEB) and, as with all Kia cars, it comes with a generous seven-year warranty.

Verdict: The all-new Kia Sportage goes straight to the top of the family SUV class with its blend of striking looks, hi-tech interior, practicality, top safety features and big bang for your bucks.

Kia UK

Kia EV6 crowned ‘Car of the Year’

Gareth Herincx

3 days ago
Auto News

Kia EV6 review

The all-new Kia EV6 electric car has been crowned What Car? Car of the Year 2022.

It’s the second time Kia has won the overall What Car? Car of the Year Award – and the second time it has won with a new electric car, having taken its maiden victory in 2019 with the Kia e-Niro.

The Kia EV6 stood out for setting new benchmarks for electric vehicles, offering an official range of 328 miles, and managing 224 miles on a charge when What Car?’s testers ran it in near worst-case low temperature conditions. It is also capable of super-fast, 800V charging, with its battery capable of going from 10-80% in as little as 18 minutes.

In addition, the EV6 earned praise from the judges for being hugely spacious, very refined even by electric car standards and for being sold with the reassurance of a standard-setting seven-year warranty.

What Car? editor Steve Huntingford said: “Once again, Kia has set a new benchmark for an electric vehicle. The EV6 is a terrific all-rounder that answers electric car buyers’ questions around range and charging times brilliantly, and which offers terrific space, refinement and value for money.

“Kia’s progress has long been impressive, but it is the way that it has seized the opportunity offered by the transition to electric cars that has made it a leader in the market. Coming hot on the heels of its victory with the e-Niro in 2019, this Car of the Year win cements its position alongside Tesla as one of the most exciting electric car makers on the planet.”

The What Car? Car of the Year 2022 winners

Car of the Year – Kia EV6 RWD GT-Line

Small car – Honda Jazz SR
Family car – Seat Leon 1.5 TSI 130 Evo FR
Small SUV – Ford Puma 1.0 Ecoboost Hybrid (mHEV)
Family SUV – Volvo XC40 Recharge T4 Plus (Dark Theme)
Electric SUV – Kia EV6 RWD GT-Line
Large SUV – Hyundai Santa Fe 4WD Premium
Luxury SUV – BMW X5 xDrive45e M Sport
Sports SUV – Ford Puma ST 1.5 ecoboost 200 Performance Pack
Hybrid (plug-in) – Lexus NX 450h F Sport Premium Plus Pack
Small electric car – Cupra Born 58kWh V2
Large electric car – Tesla Model 3 Long Range
Executive car – BMW 3 Series 330e M Sport (M Sport Pro Package)
Luxury car – BMW 5 Series 530e M Sport (M Sport Pro Package)
Estate – Skoda Superb Estate 2.0 TDI 150 SEL
MPV – Volkswagen Touran 1.5 TSI 150 SE
Pick-up – Ford Ranger 2.0L EcoBlue 213PS Wildtrack auto
Hot hatch – Mercedes-AMG A45 S Plus
Performance car – Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo 4S
Coupe – BMW 4 Series 420i M Sport (M Sport Pro Package)
Convertible – BMW 4 Series Convertible 420i (M Sport Pro Package)
Sports car – Porsche Cayman GTS

Special Awards

Reliability Award – Lexus
True MPG Award – Toyota Yaris Cross 1.5 petrol hybrid
Innovation Award – Gridserve
Safety Award – Nissan Qashqai
Tow Car Award – Kia Sorento 2.2 CRDi 3 DCT
Reader Award – All-new 2022 Range Rover

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EVs dominate European Car of the Year shortlist

Home / Auto News / EVs dominate European Car of the Year shortlist

Gareth Herincx

1 day ago
Auto News

Kia EV6 review

The shortlist of seven for Europe’s prestigious Car of the Year 2022 award has been announced – and only one of the vehicles is not pure electric.

The final group has been whittled down from 38 eligible candidates. Second-stage voting takes place in the new year, with the winning car announced in Geneva on February 28.

The magnificent seven are the Cupra Born, Ford Mustang Mach-E, Hyundai Ioniq 5, Kia EV6, Peugeot 308, Renault Megane E-Tech and Skoda Enyaq. Of these, only the Peugeot is not 100% electric.

Recent ECOTY winners include the Toyota Yaris (2021), Peugeot 208 (2020), Jaguar I-Pace (2019) and Volvo XC40 (2018).

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Gareth is a versatile journalist, copywriter and digital editor who’s worked across the media in newspapers, magazines, TV, teletext, radio and online. After long stints at the BBC, GMTV and ITV, he now specialises in motoring.

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Kia EV6 review

Kia EV6 review

We test the all-new Kia EV6 – an electric car that’s more than just eye candy

Kia has always been ahead of the curve when it comes to electrification – from the EV version of the quirky Soul in 2015 to the game-changing e-Niro of 2018, plus hybrids along the way.

Now the South Korean car company is on the money again with its EV6 – Kia first’s electric-only vehicle with a 300-mile plus range.

At launch the futuristic fastback is available as either a 321bhp four-wheel-drive (dual motor) or a more affordable 226bhp rear-drive (single motor). The usable battery capacity is 77.4kWh, regardless of which configuration you choose.

Kia EV6 review

The single motor has the greatest range (328 miles compared to 314 miles). The top speeds for both are 114mph, while the 0–60mph time for the four-wheel-drive version is 2.1 seconds faster at 5.2 seconds.

Charging from 10-80% takes as little as 18 minutes via 350kW ultra rapid charger (it’s future-proofed with 800-volt charging infrastructure). A more common 50kW charger will take one hour 13 minutes, or if you can plug-in at home (7kW) it will take seven hours 20 minutes.

Priced from £40,840 to £51,840, its rivals include everything from the Ford Mustang Mach-E to the Jaguar I-Pace, Polestar 2, Tesla Model 3, Volkswagen ID.4 and its cousin, the Hyundai Ioniq 5.

Kia EV6 review

A smidgen smaller than an I-Pace, the boldly styled EV6 also shares the stubby nose, short overhangs, pop-out door handles and big wheels of the Jag.

Inside, it’s spacious and slick, with plenty of room for five adults. Our only gripes are that we’d like the driver’s seat to lower a little more and rear visibility could be better.

Elsewhere, there’s a generous 490 litres of space in the deep, but shallow boot, expanding to 1,300 litres with the rear seats folded.

Kia EV6 review

The EV6 also features extra storage at the front – a front boot, front trunk, or ‘frunk’ – providing an additional 52 litres of storage space for RWD models and 20 litres for AWDs – more than enough space for charging cables.

Inside the cabin it has a classy feel and it’s well put together, but there are more hard plastic surfaces than we would like.

On the plus side, it is trimmed in a range of sustainable materials, such as “vegan leather” seats, and sections of the dashboard and centre console are clad in recycled plastics, equivalent to 107 plastic 500ml water bottles per car.

Kia EV6 review

There’s a large, curved touchscreen on top of the dashboard, alongside a digital driver’s display. Both are 12.3-inches and feature Kia’s usual clear graphics. Generally, it looks state-of-the-art and delivers a good mix of dials, buttons and touchscreens.

Standard equipment with the entry-level EV6 includes Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity, LED lights, heated front seats and steering wheel, sat-nav based smart cruise control and autonomous emergency braking (AEB).

Goodies further up the range includes wireless smartphone charging, privacy glass, blind-spot collision warning, a panoramic sunroof, remote smart park assist, a powered tailgate, a 14-speaker Meridian audio system and a head-up display.

Kia EV6 review

On the road the EV6 is comfortable, refined and turns heads for all the right reasons. There really is nothing like it on the market at present.

We tested both the single and dual motor versions and frankly there’s not much between them. If money is no object and the loss of 14 miles of range makes no difference, then go for the all-wheel drive version which is a tad faster and offers extra traction.

A button on the steering wheel allows you to choose between Sport, Eco and Normal drive modes. Normal is just fine and Sport is fun for overtaking, while Eco is strictly for Scrooges and motorway runs.

Kia EV6 review

The steering wheel paddles let you choose between six levels of regenerative braking, the last of which switches to “one-pedal” driving, which harvests maximum energy when you lift off the accelerator, bringing the car to a stop without touching the brakes.

The EV6 does a decent job of hiding its two-tonne weight, feeling agile and staying flat in faster corners. However, when really pushed the crossover origins it shares with the Hyundai Ioniq 5 are more obvious. No doubt the upcoming GT version will unleash the EV6’s full dynamic potential.

Kia EV6 review

That said, the steering is light enough in town, yet adds weight at speed, while the brakes are more progressive than many an EV.

No car is perfect and the EV6 is no exception, but it’s still an impressive all-round package with a range far exceeding many premium rivals.

Verdict: The all-new, all-electric EV6 is another great value game-changer from Kia – a winning blend of style, performance, practicality, technology and long-range capability.

Kia Motors UK