Revealed: The world’s most popular new car of 2023

Gareth Herincx

4 days ago
Auto News

Tesla Model Y

The Tesla Model Y is on course to take the crown as the world’s best-selling vehicle of last year.

While a small number of countries are yet to release their sales figures for 2023, preliminary data collected by automotive analyst JATO Dynamics indicates that the Model Y is in an unassailable position with 1.23 million cars sold – a 64% increase year-on-year.

“The increase in global sales of the Model Y is unprecedented, particularly for a vehicle in the top ten best-sellers,” said Felipe Munoz, Global Analyst at JATO Dynamics. “What Tesla has been able to achieve with the Model Y in such a short space of time is simply remarkable.”

Crucially, it topped sales in both Europe and China, the world’s two largest EV markets. According to data from the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers (CAAM), more than 456,000 were registered in China alone – an increase of 45% from 2022.

All this means that 2023 will mark the end of Toyota’s recent dominance with the RAV4 and Corolla leading the way. However, both models lack pure electric options, with only hybrid alternatives on offer.

Despite this, the second best-selling vehicle in 2023 is set to be the Toyota RAV4, with 1.07 million registrations, pipping the Corolla in third place (1.01 million).

Check Also



Most drivers think headlights are too bright

New research has found that 85% of motorists think the problem of headlight glare is …

Renault Austral E-Tech review

Renault Austral E-Tech

There’s no doubt that the Renault Austral E-Tech has serious kerb appeal, but what’s this classy full hybrid like to drive?

Over the years I’ve driven dozens of electric vehicles. And if you can charge from home and you’re open to a change of mindset, there’s every reason to switch.

However, running an EV is not without its issues, thanks to the patchy public charging infrastructure and high price of electricity at rapid chargers.

Which brings me to this week’s test car – the Renault Austral E-Tech. It’s a full hybrid, so there’s no need to plug it in to charge, and in theory it can travel up to 683 miles between fuel stops. No range anxiety there then!

Renault Austral E-Tech

Don’t get me wrong, I’m an EV evangelist, but for many motorists not ready to make the transition to 100% electric or without off-street parking, a full hybrid is the next best thing.

Sure, they are not as kind to the planet as EVs, but the Renault Austral E-Tech can run in EV mode for reasonable distances, emits as little as 105g/km CO2 and can achieve up to 60.1mpg.

And as full hybrids go (its rivals include the Hyundai Tucson Hybrid, Nissan Qashqai e-Power, Honda ZR-V and Toyota RAV4), it’s definitely one of the best.

About the same size as another of its competitors (the Kia Sportage), Renault’s stylish replacement for the lacklustre Kadjar is a looker.

Renault Austral E-Tech

Priced from £34,695, the range begins with the Techno, which features 19-inch alloy wheels, matrix LED headlights, flush roof bars and parking sensors with rear-view camera, plus a hands-free key card with keyless entry.

The Techno Esprit Alpine adds 20-inch wheels, black carbon fabric and Alcantara upholstery with blue stitching, heated front seats, heated steering wheel, electric power tailgate, electric driver and front passenger seats with massage function for driver, traffic/speed sign recognition, and adaptive cruise control with lane centring.

Top-of-the-range Iconic Esprit Alpine gets 4Control Advanced four-wheel steering, a 12-speaker Harman Kardon audio system, 360-degree Around View camera, panoramic sunroof, and wireless phone charging.

Renault Austral E-Tech

So, as you can see, the Austral is well equipped. Additionally, all versions get a 12-inch infotainment touchscreen, a 12.3-inch digital driver’s display, 9.3-inch head-up display, plus a range of Google services built-in, including Google Maps, Google Assistant (voice control that works), and access to Google Play.

The Austral’s 196bhp hybrid system uses a gutsy new 1.2-litre three-cylinder turbo petrol engine, two electric motors and a small 2kWh battery.

Feeling swifter than the official 0-62mph acceleration time of 8.4 seconds, the Austral can travel in EV mode up to 70mph unless you plant your right foot, in which case the engine kicks in.

And joy of joys, there’s no CVT gearbox, which means the revs don’t go sky high when accelerating. Instead, the Austral E-Tech has a seven-speed automatic transmission (which uses Renault’s Formula 1-derived clutchless technology), driving the front wheels.

Renault Austral E-Tech

Our Techno Esprit Alpine test car also had four-wheel steering, giving the Austral E-Tech a 10.1m turning circle – that’s city car levels of manoeuvrability.

On the move, it allows the rear wheels to turn in the opposite direction to the front wheels at speeds of up to 30mph, helping to increase manoeuvrability. Plus, at speeds above 30mph, the rear wheels turn in the same direction as the front wheels, for improved stability.

In fact, there’s a lot of clever stuff going on, including a suite of 30 advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

The Renault Austral E-Tech always starts in EV mode, then zips along smoothly, delivering an impressive blend of electric and petrol power, enhanced by impressive cabin sound deadening. If you’re in hurry, there’s a hesitation while the system decides what it’s going to do, but broadly speaking, it’s a very slick.

Renault Austral E-Tech

The ride is firm, but such is the joy of that punchy electrically-boosted powertrain, all is forgiven.

It’s set up for sporty handling, and works well. The steering is on the light side and the four-wheel steering turns in rather too eagerly initially, but you get used to it and after a while your confidence grows.

There’s also decent grip from those big wheels, and when pushed on more challenging roads, body lean is kept in check and it’s more agile than you might expect for a crossover.

There are four levels of regenerative braking accessible via the steering paddles, and after a while, you learn to charge the battery on long downhill runs or when coasting and braking, ready to deploy when needed. And the good news is that 55mpg is relatively easy to achieve, and in town you can get closer to 60mpg or more.

Renault Austral E-Tech

The Renault Austral E-Tech is dark inside – everywhere from the seats to the headlining and door cards. That said, it has a premium feel and it seems solidly put together.

There’s plenty of space up front, even if the lowest driving position is a tad high for taller drivers. Sliding rear seats allow you to juggle space between rear passengers and boot capacity. At its most generous setting, boot space is a useful 555 litres, rising to 1,455 litres with the rear seats flipped down.

So, the Austral E-Tech isn’t perfect, but after a few days it really grows on you. And let’s face it, 600-odd miles out of a tank of petrol is very welcome.

Verdict: The Renault Austral E-Tech is one of the best full hybrid family SUVs on the market. Good-looking, classy, packed with tech, practical and economical, it should definitely be on any family car shortlist.

Renault UK

Nissan X-Trail review

Nissan X-Trail review

We get to grips with the impressive all-new Nissan X-Trail SUV – now an electrified seven-seater…

The Nissan X-Trail is a global success story. Originally launched in 2001, more than seven million have been sold globally, making it one of the world’s most popular SUVs. In the UK alone, some 138,599 have found homes.

Now it’s the turn of the fourth-generation X-Trail, marketed as “the only electrified seven-seater SUV”.

However, there’s more to the new X-Trail than the optional extra seats. It’s everything you’d expect from a vehicle with such well-established DNA, but it also delivers state-of-the-art hybrid technology, versatile packaging, comfort and genuine off-road capability.

Nissan X-Trail

Priced from £32,030 to £47,155 and available as either a mild-hybrid or with Nissan’s unique ‘e-Power’ hybrid powertrain, the X-Trail is more than a match for its rivals which include the Skoda Kodiaq, Hyundai Santa Fe, Kia Sorrento and latest Toyota RAV4 (though it only has five seats).

The X-Trail takes design cues from its smaller sibling, the Qashqai, including the brand’s signature ‘V-Motion’ trapezoidal grille.

Wider and taller than the outgoing model, it’s well-proportioned with a chunky, more muscular design. The extra cladding around the wheel arches and bumpers, slim headlights and big wheels (20 inches on our test car) give it real road presence.

Nissan X-Trail review

The interior of the new X-Trail is a big step-up too. Modern, spacious and bathed in light, it has a near-premium feel with classy materials and great build quality.

There’s a commanding view of the road from the comfy seats, and if you do have any qualms about manoeuvring into tight spaces, there’s ample tech on board to help you, whether it’s sensors or a 360-degree camera with Moving Object Detection.

Your choice of grade (from entry-level Visia to top-of-the-range Tekna ) will determine which goodies you get with your car, but we’d say the mid-range N-Connecta which gets the twin 12.3-inch displays up front, roof rails and privacy glass is a good choice.

Nissan X-Trail review

However, if you splash out on the next grade up (Tekna) you get a panoramic sunroof, electric tailgate, head-up display, wireless phone charger and ProPilot Assist with Navi-Link – an impressive suite of safety and driver assistance tech.

The top-of-the-range Tekna comes with 20-inch diamond-cut alloy wheels, a premium Bose sound system with 10 speakers and quilted leather seats.

Equipment and tech is one thing, but the big decision you have to make with the new Nissan X-Trail is which electrified powertrain to choose.

The entry-level option is a 161bhp 1.5-litre turbocharged petrol with mild hybrid assistance, which is only available with front-wheel drive.

Next up is the X-Trail e-POWER, which is Nissan’s take on a full hybrid (no need to plug it in). The drivetrain combines a 1.5-litre petrol engine of 201bhp with a 150kW electric motor on the front axle.

Nissan X-Trail review

Unusually, the petrol engine doesn’t drive the wheels at all – it simply acts as a generator to charge the 2.1kWh battery and power the electric motor, which is responsible for driving the wheels at all times.

The top-spec all-wheel drive (e-4ORCE) powertrain option uses the same e-POWER configuration, but adds a 100kW electric motor to the rear axle, increasing the X-Trail’s power output to 211bhp.

The stats for the three powertrains are predictable. Fuel economy on the mild hybrid is up to 39.9mpg, CO2 emissions start at 161g/km, while the 0-62mph sprint takes 9.6 seconds.

Nissan X-Trail review

The two-wheel drive e-POWER takes eight seconds to reach 62mph and can manage as much as 48.6mpg, while CO2 is as low as 132g/km.

Finally, the e-POWER with e-4ORCE is the fastest accelerating (7 secs), has CO2 emissions starting at 143g/km and fuel economy tops out at 44.7mpg.

Unless you need all-wheel drive, on paper the mid-range X-trail with e-POWER looks like it offers the best blend of performance and economy.

Perhaps what’s most surprising is that Nissan’s hybrid system produces economy figures which are not dissimilar to a conventional hybrid where a battery provides electrical assistance to a petrol motor which drives the wheels.

We tested the flagship e-POWER with e-4ORCE on a mixed driving route, which included some gentle off-roading and controlled automotive gymnastics – and it’s an impressive piece of kit.

Gareth Herincx Nissan X-Trail Slovenia

As you glide off, it’s immediately clear that the new Nissan X-Trail is no ordinary 4×4. The ride is smooth (even with the 20-inch wheels), the cabin is a comfortable and refined place to be, and it feels substantial.

Despite its large dimensions, it’s easy to drive with light and responsive steering. Hustle it a little and it remains remarkably composed.

Body lean is surprisingly well controlled in more challenging corners and there’s superb grip and traction – even on the rough stuff. In fact, it’s very capable off-road, demonstrating a surprising amount of agility in a serious of tests.

Gareth Herincx Nissan X-Trail Slovenia

It takes a while to get used to the sensation of the engine revving away in the background as it charges up the battery. The only time it makes its presence known is when you’re heavy with your right foot, especially on uphill stretches.

Though it’s reasonably vocal, frankly it’s nowhere near as intrusive as full hybrids using CVT transmission from other manufacturers.

Nissan says the X-Trail has a 10,000 times faster rear torque response than a mechanical 4WD system, adding that the constant torque redistribution also contributes to handling and ride comfort, enabling a powerful yet smooth, driving experience.

I’ll go along with that, because the X-Trail is an excellent all-rounder – just as content cruising on a motorway as it is soaking up the worst poor surfaces have to offer.

Nissan X-Trail

What’s more, the X-Trail has always been a favourite with caravanners, so the braked towing capacity of up to 2,000kg will be welcome.

Finally, let’s deal with one of the X-Trail’s USPs – that optional third row of seats. I’m a fraction under six-foot and I could squeeze into seats six and seven, but in order to travel any distance the second row would have to slide forward, which may in turn require some compliance from the driver and front passenger too.

So, I’d say the third row of seats is there for occasional use, preferably children and small adults.

With the third row of seats in use, the X-Trail’s boot has a capacity of 485 litres. In five-seat formation (where there’s ample space for three passengers) this increases to 585 litres, and with both sets of rear seats down there’s a cavernous 1,424 litres of space.

A quick mention too for the rear doors which open at an impressive 85-degree angle (just like a Qashqai) for easy access – useful for lifting small children into car seats, for instance.

Verdict: Smooth, refined, robust and easy to drive, the hybrid Nissan X-Trail is a class act. Offering a unique proposition in the SUV sector, it’s also surprisingly capable off-road and delivers big bang for your bucks.

Nissan UK

Mazda CX-60 review

Mazda CX-60

We road test the plug-in hybrid version of the classy new Mazda CX-60 mid-sized SUV…

Slotting in above the slightly smaller CX-5, the all-new CX-60 is Mazda’s new flagship SUV.

Not only does it close the gap on premium rivals from Europe, such as Audi, BMW, Jaguar, Range Rover and Volvo, but it’s available as Mazda’s first ever plug-in hybrid.

The Japanese company still hasn’t given up on the internal combustion engine and the PHEV version is a natural progression.

Mazda CX-60

What’s more, plug-in hybrids look like they will get a stay of execution for five years after the sales of new petrol and diesel cars are banned in 2030, so there’s life in the technology yet.

The CX-60 PHEV combines a normally aspirated 2.5-litre four-cylinder petrol engine with a 100kW electric motor and a 17.8kWh battery.

The result is a total output of 323bhp and 369lb ft of torque, making it the most powerful road car Mazda has ever produced, capable of sprinting from standstill to 62mph in just 5.8 seconds.

What’s more, on paper, fuel economy could be as high as 188mpg with CO2 emissions as low as 33g/km.

Mazda CX-60

Offering up to 39 miles of pure electric driving from a full charge, your visits to a petrol station could be few and far between if you have a modest daily commute. And if you’re a business user, considerable tax advantages come with that meagre CO2 figure.

Further down the line, Mazda will also be offering the CX-60 with 3.3-litre diesel and 3.0-litre petrol engines – both six-cylinders paired with a 48V mild hybrid system.

Priced from £43,950, there’s a choice of three plush trim levels – Exclusive-Line, Homura and Takumi.

You can also choose from two option packs across all grades (Convenience Pack and Driver Assistance Pack), while a Comfort Pack is available on Exclusive-Line.

Mazda CX-60

Highlights of the £1,000 Convenience Pack include privacy glass, a 360 view monitor and wireless phone charging, while the Driver Assistance Pack adds extra active safety technology for £1,100.

The £1,400 Comfort Pack includes goodies such as 20-inch alloy wheels, electric front seats, front seat ventilation and heated rear seats.

Not only is the CX-60 PHEV well equipped, it’s superbly put together and the quality of the materials used inside the cabin is excellent.

Externally, the CX-60 is very similar to the CX-5, but can be distinguished by its bold nose, which polarises opinion. Let’s just say that it’s not the most attractive Mazda head-on.

Mazda CX-60

And at just 190mm longer, 50mm wider and about the same height, there’s not much between them in size, though the CX-60’s more athletic stance hides its height a little better.

There’s nothing revolutionary inside the cabin. It’s still very much a Mazda, which is no bad thing.

There’s a large centrally-located 12.3-inch infotainment screen on top of the dashboard, while Mazda’s sticking with its rotary controller near the gear selector. It’s not a touchscreen, and much of the car’s functionality is accessed by a twist and click.

If you’re not used to a touchscreen, it works well from the off, and even if you are, it becomes second nature after a few hours.

Mazda CX-60

Thankfully, Mazda has kept some buttons and dials, so the climate control can be accessed separately and there’s still an audio volume knob. Additionally, there’s extra functionality, such as cruise control via the steering wheel, while the clear head-up display is one of the best.

The cabin itself is spacious, though little different to the CX-5 in the back, so while adults can sit comfortably in the rear, there’s not class-leading legroom.

The CX-60’s substantial 570-litre boot is about 50 litres bigger than the CX-5’s, expanding to 1,726 litres with the rear seats folded down.

The driving position is great, with plenty of adjustment available (unusually for an SUV, it is possible to sit lower if you prefer). Whichever you choose, there’s a commanding view of the road.

Mazda CX-60

If you’ve had your CX-60 on charge (it takes 2hr 20 min via a 7kW home charger), or you have some charge left, it will start off in EV mode.

Unlike some PHEVs, there is a vague whine from the off, but it’s smooth going and, in theory, if you take it easy the petrol engine won’t kick in until you hit 62mph.

The transition from EV to petrol and vice versa is seamless if you’re not in a hurry. However, if you’re heavy with your right foot there’s a little hesitation and the petrol engine becomes more vocal.

There are four drive modes accessed by a selector (Mi-Drive) near the rotary controller – Normal, Sport, Off-Road and EV.

Mazda CX-60

Frankly, Normal is just fine. The driver’s display turns an angry red if you select Sport and the engine can get a little harsh, but it does firm up the throttle response and handling.

Obviously EV will keep you driving in electric mode until the battery runs out, while Off-Road will help you along if the going gets tough.

Mazda isn’t pretending it’s a hardcore 4×4, but the extra traction and raised ride height should help you out on those rare extreme weather occasions.

The petrol engine is mated to a new eight-speed automatic transmission, and for the most part it works perfectly well. However, it can be hesitant on kickdown and hold onto a gear for a little longer on hills. Should that happen, it is possible to manually hurry things along via the steering wheel paddle shifters.

Initially, the CX-60 feels big and heavy, but thanks to that excellent driving position and Mazda’s “Kinetic Posture Control” technology, you soon settle in, and it feels surprisingly agile and controlled in more challenging corners.

Mazda CX-60

There’s plenty of grip and traction, while the steering is light and precise. As with most hybrids, the brakes aren’t the most progressive, but they are effective, and you soon get used to them.

The ride is on the firm side, and even though there’s plenty of power on tap, it is at its most relaxed and refined best cruising along.

As with any PHEV, fuel economy will depend on whether you keep the battery charged up, journey length, speed and driving style. So, while 100mpg is quite possible on shorter runs where the petrol engine is hardly used, your MPG can dip into the 30s on longer trips when the battery charge is used up and the 2.5-litre petrol engine does the heavy lifting.

It’s also worth noting that the CX-60 is one of the few PHEVs able to pull a caravan or trailer with a decent towing capacity of 2,500kg.

The CX-60 is a welcome addition to the plug-in hybrid club that includes some formidable opposition in the shape of the Toyota RAV4, Volvo XC60, Lexus NX, Audi Q5 and BMW X3.

Verdict: The boldly styled new Mazda CX-60 is a class act. Practical, powerful, engaging to drive, generously equipped and well put together with quality materials, it’s very much a premium SUV.

Mazda UK

Wild family adventures with TV’s Steve Backshall and Toyota

Gareth Herincx

1 day ago
Auto Blog

Steve Backshall, Toyota RAV4 and kids

Keeping kids occupied during the summer holidays is no easy task. Exploring the great outdoors, whatever the weather, is one way to enjoy time together as a family.

Toyota has teamed up with TV naturalist, adventurer and father-of-three Steve Backshall to provide ideas for adventures in nature.

Steve and his wife – two-time Olympic champion rower Helen Glover – spent their respective childhoods exploring the Surrey heathland and Cornish beaches.

“For many parents, bug-hunting and pond-dipping are reminiscent of their own childhoods, while for others, new ideas for outdoor experiences will help increase knowledge and appreciation of the natural world and will entertain kids of any age during the long school holidays,” says Steve.

Steve’s trusted countryside companion is the new Toyota RAV4 Plug-in Hybrid SUV, which is ideal for a family expeditions.

Steve Backshall, Toyota RAV4 and kids

It offers low emissions and can drive for up to 46 miles in pure electric mode. All-wheel drive is standard and there’s a Trail Mode, so it’s perfect for tackling tricky terrain, plus there’s boot space for naturalist kit, picnics and spare clothes.

Steve and Helen’s new book, Wildlings: How to raise your family in nature (published by Two Roads) contains the following outdoor ideas for all the family…

  • Building an A-frame den in the woods: dens can be used as hideouts, birdwatching hides, or simply as somewhere to shelter when it rains, and building them is a fun family activity.  Find two trees close together with lowish forks and put a long straight branch between them.  Use material you find on the ground to build up each side of the den, propping sticks in a row against the long branch.  Use smaller, bendy sticks to weave in and out of the upright sticks – the den should look a bit like a tent shaped basket.  Finish by packing leaves, grass, or moss on top to fill in the gaps.
  • Treasure hunt in the woods: a common parenting challenge is how to get children to walk further. A treasure hunt is a great way to do this.  On family walks, scoring arrows into the mud or sand, or making arrows with sticks or stones, can help engage children and will distract from cries of ‘are we nearly there yet?’
  • Go blackberry picking: blackberry picking is a great way to introduce children to foraging. Blackberries are easy to pick as they tend to grow at a child’s height, often beside paths or hedgerows, and it’s easy for a child to identify a ripe from an unripe blackberry simply by looking at the colour. The whole family will enjoy eating the harvested berries, or you could get the kids involved in making and eating a blackberry crumble.
  • Butterfly hunts: a butterfly net, or sweep net, is a fun way to find out what is living in a park, field, or meadow.  Over the summer holidays, you’re likely to catch bush crickets, moths and butterflies.  Sweep the net through the upper sections of grasses in the colourful bits of a meadow, but be careful not to damage wildflowers.  You can put the collected insects in a ‘pooter’.  This is a little pot with two straws attached, where you suck on one straw and the insects are gently whisked into the pot for examination (there’s a valve on the human straw so there is no danger of getting a mouthful of ants!). Use a hand lens with x10 magnification to identify insects and examine them in detail. Remember to release them afterwards.
  • Bird spotting: according to the British Ornithologists Union, 574 different bird species have been spotted in the British Isles, and kids can learn to identify them by sight using a guide to British birds, or sticker book, or by sound, using free mobile apps such as BirdNET.  You only need to record a few seconds of birdsong and the app will identify the bird.
  • Wildlife photography challenge: Steve says: “Everyone has a camera and learning to capture a moment in time through a lens, how to frame a picture and when to take a photo, are lessons that require a child to slow down and connect with nature. Smartphones are fine for taking pictures of mini-beasts, or sunsets, or capturing the dew on a spider’s web.  Encourage youngsters to identify a subject, and place it in the centre of the shot, making sure the light falls on it.   Then set a photography project, such as taking photos of 10 things beginning with the letter ‘P,’ or five things you think an animal would want to eat.” No smartphone will rival what you can capture with an SLR (single lens reflex) camera, so you might want to invest in one.  Big lenses let you photograph birds and deer from a distance and take wildlife photography to a whole new level.
  • Setting a wildlife camera trap: camera traps have transformed naturalist pursuits, and easy-to-use, compact HD video camera traps are reasonably priced. Classic subjects are badgers, which are shy, nocturnal creatures.  If you set a camera trap near a badger sett, the results can be spectacular.  Choose a sett entrance that is used frequently – it will have the fewest cobwebs across it and may have the most teddy-bear-like footprints at the front.  Think of the height of a badger when setting the camera; don’t aim it too high, and make sure the shot is wide enough to see more than the animal running in and out of frame. Also, don’t position it where it could be damaged or stolen, or in the way of people or wildlife.
  • Woodland treasure hunt: Steve suggests that every ramble can turn into an animal detective novel: “Tracking has drama, secrets, the potential to experience an animal you may never see, to feel you are walking in their footsteps.”  Challenge the kids to look for things like a discarded nutshell, a feather, an acorn, an animal print, evidence of animal feeding areas, or animal trails.
  • Learn to use an Ordnance Survey (OS) map: with a GPS in everyone’s pocket, map-reading is a dying art, but learning to see the relief of the land from the contours is a skill that saves time and could save a life in the future. Micro-nav is fine for navigating short distances, following a compass bearing. Give your kids a six-figure grid reference for a point of interest, such as a tower, or a footbridge over a small stream, to plot on the OS map.  Give them a compass bearing, or another grid reference which they need to find, then follow the bearing to the next grid point.  This can be challenging, even in a city park, as if you are a degree out on your bearing, you could end up off-track.
  • Pond dipping: Steve recommends swimming pool nets for pond-dipping, as they are sturdier than seaside fishing nets.  At a pond or river, get the kids to sweep the net through the water in a figure of eight movement to catch as much life as possible, then empty the contents into a tray or jam jar.  You’ll find vertebrates such as newts, frogs, and small fish, by sweeping around reeds.  For invertebrates it is better to sweep the river or pond bed. Remember to tip everything back into the water when you’ve finished.

Steve Backshall, Toyota RAV4 and kids

Steve’s recommended wildings kit

Naturalist kit:

  • Hand lens x 10 magnification
  • Binoculars
  • Wildlife camera trap
  • SLR camera (single lens reflex camera)
  • Butterfly nets
  • Pond-dipping nets and jam jars
  • Buckets and spades
  • OS maps
  • Wildlife guidebooks

Practical essentials:

  • Change of clothes
  • Towels
  • Wetsuits (if planning to kayak, canoe or surf)
  • Snacks, water in reusable bottles, flask of tea
  • Sun cream
  • Spare battery pack for mobile phone
  • Umbrella

Check Also



10 Secrets Dealers Don’t Want You To Know When Buying a Used Car

Purchasing a vehicle can be an exciting adventure. You’ve probably done your homework and chosen …